Mrs Humanities

Because I'm married to the job


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Guest Post from @Jennnnnn_x – Stretch & Challenge. A few ideas….

guest postStretch & Challenge. A few ideas….

How can we ensure all students are challenged every lesson? Here are a few ideas I have used to encourage challenge in my Geography lessons recently.

What can you find out?

“Learning happens when people have to think hard” Prof. Robert Coe – Durham University. How often do we make students think hard – looking back I know that I don’t do it as often as I probably should…

So here is one idea I have used at the start of my lessons:

This example was for a Year 10 introductory lesson to Urban Issues.

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I left my students with this image on the board/a copy each and then left them to think for 15 minutes (which felt like eternity) I then gave them some discussion time. Amazingly they came up with most of the ideas off the specification – they annotated their image to show their thoughts and added to them through discussion. I repeated this with my year 9’s and while there was more moaning, once they realised I wouldn’t help them they tried a bit harder and I had similar outcomes – they had summarised our whole topic in about 25 words and from one photograph.  Have a go – you might be surprised what they come up with!

Hexagons

An old one, but a good one. I remember seeing hexagons everywhere a few years ago but I had forgotten about them until I came across an old example when tidying my classroom. So I started using them again and I remembered why I like them so much! There is no right answer – which means there is lots of room for discussion and often the students come up with links that you might not have thought of.

I used this idea to support an exam question in a year 13 lesson looking at LDC countries. I put images onto the hexagons and the students cut them out, stuck them next to others and then annotated the links between them. They then used this to plan their essay. It worked well due to two reasons – it supported lower ability students as the photographs helped as a prompt to start different sections but it also challenged the higher ability students because the ‘link’ is usually where this class fall down – they forget to link their ideas to both the question but also other topics.

Here is an example:

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IDEAL analysis

Command words – are the one thing every time I mark mock exams I wish my students understood. Despite doing a range of activities linked to command words and having them stuck around my room and on the table in front of them, I till find students explain when the question asks them to describe and vice-versa.

With the new examination changes and the increasing level of literacy needed to interpret some of the questions the focus on command words is more important than ever!

I went to a PIXL conference back in November and saw Rebecca Chew (@MissChewBeka) present her ideas on stretch and challenge… I have used every single one of them in various lessons since but my favourite is most definitely the IDEAL analysis.

It is based around a need for students to understand the different command words, but also that as we move through the word IDEAL the difficulty increases.

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I – identify – what is it that you can you see?
D – describe – what does it look like, where are different objects/landforms?
E – explain – why is it like that, what are the reasons for what you can see?
A – apply – where else might this happen, how might it be similar/different?
L – link – how does this link to wider geography, other topics, other places?

Students seem to like it and more importantly find it useful. I recently marked a year 10 mock which asked students to use a figure (a photograph of the devastation caused by an earthquake) to support their answer and saw many of them plan their answer using IDEAL.

Below is also an example of a differentiated worksheet given to support some of the students in my class.

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There are some more examples on my twitter if you want to take a look (@jennnnnn_x)

Hope some of these ideas are useful,

Jen (@jennnnnn_x)

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Recommendation – Twinkl Secondary Resources

Recently I’ve started to make use of the newly added Twinkl Secondary Geography resources.

The variety of resources is huge with 12 pages of material so far covering everything from tectonics and coasts to tourism and urban issues. The most common of geography topics all make an appearance.

At present there are plenty of resources for Key Stage 3 and a growing number for Key Stage 4 linked to the AQA, Edexcel and OCR specifications. Key Stage 5 is currently bare but an area for future development.

Each of the lesson packs are fully resourced, many of which have eco-print versions, as are many of the stand alone lessons or single activities.

Personally I really like the opportunity for differentiation in the lesson packs, they are a great starting point to differentiate up or down depending on your students. Some resources even have differentiated versions already. I wish they’d had these when I worked at my last school, they would have been of massive benefit and would have saved me so much time with planning, differentiation and scaffolding.

My personal favourites are

But don’t take my word for it, check the resources out for yourself over at Twinkl.co.uk

Mrs Humanities

 

 

 


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History on TV

history on TV

Whilst I set up Geography on TV I thought I should probably set up a History on TV.

Since I do like a bit collaboration, I’ve set up a collaborative google doc might be useful. It’s pretty simple, if you know of a show or have watched a show add it to the week it will or was broadcast. Then other teachers can see what’s on or what will be on.

history template

If it’s already been broadcast well don’t worry, add it anyway. With the power of technology these days, it can then be searched for on one of the many catch up sites or channels. Simple.

Here’s an example for Geography for the week commencing the 12th June.

12th june

If you’d like to help create this it’s really easy to collaborate. Simply click here to be taken to the google drive folder. Find the relevant week, organised by week commencing and add the following details

  • name of show
  • time its on

If it’s on a channel not listed as the ‘core’ channels add it to the ‘Others’ row and all include the channel name.

Hope we can produce something useful for each other and our students.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Geography on TV

geog on tv

Recently I asked if anyone produced a TV schedule for Geography on TV at all. I was informed that @DreamTeachGeog used to produce one but stopped at some point last year. A shame, as it’s only recently something that occurred to me as I was thinking of how to further stretch and develop inquiry within my learners.

As always I like collaboration and decided that a collaborative google doc might be useful. It’s pretty simple, if you know of a show or have watched a show add it to the week it will or was broadcast. Then other teachers can see what’s on or what will be on.

template

If it’s already been broadcast well don’t worry, add it anyway. With the power of technology these days, it can then be searched for on one of the many catch up sites or channels. Simple.

Here’s an example for the week commencing the 12th June.

12th june

If you’d like to help create this it’s really easy to collaborate. Simply click here to be taken to the google drive folder. Find the relevant week, organised by week commencing and add the following details

  • name of show
  • time its on

If it’s on a channel not listed as the ‘core’ channels add it to the ‘Others’ row and all include the channel name.

Hope we can produce something useful for each other and our students.

Mrs Humanities


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UK County Word Cloud Project by Alan Parkinson

You may have already spotted this project from Alan on twitter or on his site Living Geography since there have already been a solid number of responses.

If you haven’t, then you can read more about the project here. It’s a great link to this year’s Young Geographer of the Year theme and something that could be done in class.

Add your contribution to it by filling in the form below.

I look forward to seeing the results in the summer.