Mrs Humanities

Because I'm married to the job.


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Resource – Spanish Armada Double Lesson

Today I’m sharing with you one of my favourite double lessons on the Spanish Armada and its defeat.

I particularly love it for two reasons; firstly I was observed teaching part 1 by Ofsted and received a glowing report from the inspector, secondly it enables students to demonstrate their progress very easily over the two lessons.

The resources are an amalgamation of my own ideas and that of others from resources I’ve collated the past few years.

Lesson 1 – The lesson starts with an empathy exercise – putting yourself in the image – and has 3 options for students to choose how to approach the task. Students imagine they are in the image which zooms in and out, I also put sound effects on as students enter the classroom. The choice enables all students to access the task; no matter their ability or the time in which they entered the room.

starter
I’ve edited a few bits out that were relevant to the previous lesson so this resource follows on with a bit of information about the Navy Royal and some rather famous ships. It’s at this point I assess prior knowledge asking questions to obtain what students already know about the Spanish Armada (usually very little).

Next we watch a video and carry out a true or false exercise followed by self-assessment of the answers. To print off the tables off go to the end of the PowerPoint slides for a printable version.

After further discussion we move onto interpreting sources, starting with carrying out an example together.

Finally it’s on to the main task.

main task

This involves looking at sources to interpret why the Spanish were defeated. The activity has been differentiated into 3 bands of challenge for a very mixed ability group.

Spice Level 1 = designed for the lowest ability, many of these students struggled with reading and writing

Spice Level 2 = designed for the middle range most students choose to do this one

Spice Level 3 =  designed towards the most able in the year group

bronzeSilverGold

Students have the opportunity to choose the level of challenge  so they can go above but not below their target level. e.g. students working toward previous level 4 in year 8, would have been aiming to complete the bronze criteria for the topic and therefore would have been guided towards the Spice Level 1 task but could choose to do the Spice Level 2 task, whereas a student working towards level 7 would have only be allowed to do the Spice Level 3 task.

Students progress to different parts of the task sheet, dependent on the level of the task they are working on.

To finish the lesson, students select the criteria they would like assessed by their peer assessment buddy. See the criteria on the slide below. Students are encouraged to pick their weakness for peer assessment. Students then swap books and using the peer assessment pens (green) they use the marking codes or highlight relevant text. Finally they provide a kind comment and a level up target for the student to focus on next lesson.

peer assessment.png

peer assessment 2.png

Lesson 2

Students finish off the work they started the previous lesson, however this time every time the do the level up target they write in pink pen to evidence their progression.

DIRT.png
I’ve found that when students use a different colour pen to demonstrate the their progress they work a lot harder at doing it correctly e.g. if in lesson 1 a student kept spelling Armada wrong, in lesson 2 they use the pink pen when they use the word in their work. For others it has been for example using punctuation, every time they did a capital letter and full stop it would need to be in pink, this approach made them more conscientious of their work.

Finally if time students self-assess and peer-assess their work using the feedback grid I would use to mark it. They would simply tick the criteria they felt they’d achieved.

When marking the work I would then highlight in one colour the achieved criteria and highlight in a separate colour the criteria they could improve on. For some classes I set improvements as homework others have time in a DIRT lesson later in the term.

feedback

If you’d like to download the resources click here.

Hope the resources can be of use to you.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Sharing Resources – TES

Evening.

Since I’m moving on from my current role and won’t be needing many of the units of work and resources I created over the past two years, I’ve decided to upload and share them for others to access and use freely.

Although I’m happy for the new Head of Department to have them, I also want others to benefit from the time and effort I’ve put into making them (and there’s been a lot).

So to view the full units of work and download any of the resources follow the links below

I will add more links to this post as I upload to the TES.

The Powerpoints are all my work, most of the resources are but some I’ve edited and reformed into pieces suitable for my classes. If I’ve failed to give credit where credit is due (more than likely) please let know and I will amend.

Feedback is always appreciated as I like to know how to improve my work, however please don’t moan about the use of Open Dyslexic font (yes, it’s happened).

You can find other resources of mine through my TES shop (although everything is free).

Hope you find the resources of use.

Mrs Humanities

suffragette protest and publicity visual hexagon


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Resource – Suffragette Market Place

Currently I’m teaching the suffrage movement, possibly my favourite historical topic.

Thought I’d share my most recent resource on the campaign tactics of the suffragettes.

The lesson focuses around a ‘market place’ activity.

Students start the lesson by being given an information sheet on a campaign tactic of the suffragettes. Start by taking notes in a simplified format on the Market Place Information Collection Sheet.

Next they share their information, filling in the rest of the sheet as they discuss the tactics with others. After class feedback, students complete the Visual Hexagon activity to demonstrate what they have learnt about the campaign tactics used by the suffragettes.

To download the resources simply click the images.

Market Place Information Collection Sheet

market place sheet

 

Visual Hexagon Task (inspired by Jivespin)

hexagon

Powerpoint

powerpoint

Information Sheetsinfo sheets

Source of images have been hyper-linked and a list of websites used to compile the information can be found at the end of the information sheet.

Hope they can be of use.

 

Mrs Humanities

 


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Resource – Source Analysis

source analysisLast month on twitter I spotted this post and knew I could make use of this idea.

I responded to the tweet and they very kindly sent me a copy of their source analysis overlay along with the original idea by @russelltarr aka @activehistory. I immediately made my own version following the inspiration.

original source overlay

It’s quite simple to create the overlay, you just cut out the ‘white’ area of your printed sheets and laminate or pop them into a plastic wallet like I did.

I’ve used the idea twice so far. First time I used it was with year 8 to help them to interpret primary and secondary sources; initially they used it to make sense of the source and then they started to consider how useful the source had been to their enquiry about farming and land use change in Kent. The discussion and interpretation was interesting to hear. Although I think this group need a lesson on the difference between wine and beer 😉

IMG_0365 (2)

They’ll be using this approach again this week, but I’ve changed the questions a bit to encourage them to make interpretations of the sources they are looking at rather than assess the usefulness of the source.

source overlay

The second time I used it with year 11 in their study of Rosa Park’s actions on December 1st 1955 and the resulting Montgomery bus boycott. The task encouraged them to interpret and assess the usefulness of the sources. Something I’ve had to spend a lot of time on since taking over the department. They said they felt ‘wrong’ writing on the tables which really seemed to engage them, it’s not often that I have such a quiet classroom with this class. The next lesson they wrote an extended piece of writing using success criteria, which clearly demonstrated their progress from this lesson.

yr 11

You can download my templates by clicking on the images or download them here.

If you use them share the results with me on twitter and I’m sure @activehistory would be keen to them as well.

Hope it’s another useful idea.

Mrs Humanities


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Resources – Battle of Hastings Learning Grid

Battle of HastingsThis summer I did the one thing I always struggle to do, read a book (or two).  Well in fact I’m still reading them but still…
You see it’s not that I don’t enjoy reading, I’ve just always found it difficult to just take the time to sit and read. I’m no good at switching off.

I love research and as a result I’m very much a skim reader. I tend not to read fictional books,  if I do it really has to be something that draws me in to keep my attention (suggestions welcomed).

Anyway I decided to purchase two books this summer, the first a fairytale book crossed with a biography of Britain’s forests called Gossip from the Forest by Sara Maitland. A magical read so far. The second a non-fiction very inspiring book entitled Outstanding Teaching: Engaging Learners by Andy Griffith  and Mark Burns. 

The first thing I’ve tried from Outstanding Teaching: Engaging Learners is the idea of a learning grid. I did a search for them on-line but didn’t find anything in relation to History or Geography so I decided to give it ago for my first topic of the year with year 8 – The Battle of Hastings.

The idea behind a learning grid is that the pupils are given (or create) a 6 x 6 grid with information in each square. There are a variety of ways for using them but the easist format seems to be that the pupils roll a dice twice giving them a grid reference, they then roll the dice again to give another grid reference. The pupils then attempt to connect the information in the two squares. Another way could be to roll the dice twice to produce a grid reference and then the pupils categorise the information or pictures in the grid with predefined choices. There are a variety of other possible ways of carrying out the task suggested in the book.

The levelled assessment I’ve created requires my pupils to answer the question ‘Why did William win the Battle?’. We’re going to study the events leading up to the battle, re-enact the battle and investigate the profiles of the two armies in order to answer the question. In the lesson prior to the assessment I’m going to give them the Battle of Hastings Learning Grid that I’ve created. Now obviously having only just discovered this technique I don’t know how well it will work, but I’ll let you know once I’ve tried it. I’m optimistic it will engage them, particularly the more verbal pupils.

I’ve made two versions the first is simply the 6 x 6 grid with information relating to either the Anglo-Saxons or the Normans. This will require the pupils to firstly decide whether the information refers to the Anglo-Saxons or the Normans, this will require the pupils to consider their learning from previous lessons. Following the first step they will then discuss how this information would have related to William winning the battle. Learning Grid

The second version provides a bit more support for the lower ability pupils. I’ve colour coded the boxes into 3 categories – Saxons, Normans or Other. The pupils will be discussing how each piece of information contributes to why William won the battle. I’m also going to provide some images to help the more visual learners but can’t include those for copyright reasons.

Learning Grid Support

 

These were really easy to make and I believe they will be very beneficial to my learners. I look forward to using them and will let you know how they went in a few weeks times.

If you’d like to give these a try, click on the images to download the documents. If you’d like an editable version feel free to email me.

 

If you use them let me know how they go. I love feedback and love to hear your comments (good or bad).

Enjoy!

Mrs Humanities