Mrs Humanities

Because I'm married to the job


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Mrs Humanities shares… A-Z of Twitter for Teacher CPD

twitter a to z (1)

I’m not entirely sure what spurred this post to be written; usually I have them whirling around in my head for a few days but this morning I woke up early, turned the computer on and out it came. So here’s my A-Z of Twitter for teacher CPD, part encouragement to join twitter, part advice for newbies to twitter.

a – ask
If you ever need resources, ideas or some inspiration for a topic or lesson, all you need to do is ask. There is always at least 1 person willing to share. In addition there are so many knowledgeable people willing to support, guide and offer advice. You just have to be willing to ask.
b – bookmark blogs
There are an incredible number of education bloggers that tweet or tweachers that blog. Finding the time read them all can be hard. I highly recommend making use of a bookmarking app such as pinterest, flipboard, google bookmarks or similar to keep track of them for when you do have downtime to read them.
c – connect
Twitter has been a source of connecting to others during my hardest of times. It stopped me from feeling as alone as I could have. Personally I’ve made some incredible friends as a result of twitter and whilst I may not work directly with people, some feel more like colleagues than online acquaintances. Try it.
d – debate
Now this one can be a challenge. Debates sometimes can lead to arguments on twitter. It’s difficult to put across what you want to say in so few characters and as a result debates can quickly turn into arguments, particularly in the school holidays. But don’t let that put you off. It’s good to have your thinking challenged. You don’t even have to get involved in debates and discussions; being a bystander can be as much of benefit as being involved providing you are willing to listen to all sides of the debate and challenge your own thinking.
e – engage
It’s all well and good signing up to twitter, you can find plenty of inspiration and ideas by merely following people but to get the most out of twitter for your own CPD purposes you need to engage with others, conversations etc. Start by liking a tweet or two, then respond, then share your own resources, links etc.
f – feedback
Provide feedback to those you borrow ideas from, firstly it helps both of you to develop your practice as a result of the reflection process and secondly it feels great to receive feedback on a resource or idea you’ve worked hard at.
g – give
As great as twitter is for borrowing ideas, it needs us all to give as well. If we leave the giving to a small handful of people; ideas run dry, practice stagnates, contempt sets in. For every resource you borrow/steal/magpie etc. give something back whether it be a link to a useful article, offering an idea or giving out a copy of your own resource. We all need to give a little back to those that share profusely.
h – hashtags
Hashtags are great for sorting your tweets, highlighting content of your tweets and most importantly to create a sense of community. Most subjects have their own #Team tag such as #TeamEnglish #TeamGeog and #TeamRE to name a few. As well as hashtags for communities there are plenty of education chats as well. Here’s a link or two to get you started
a) Hashtag list
b) Edu-Chats
i – ignore
Unfortunately you’ll find some educators on twitter believing they are the epitome of what the rest of us should be like; don’t let them fool you. Ignore these behaviours and don’t let them make you feel like you are not worthy of your job title. If you really don’t like what some people have to say or their behaviour, follow the advice you’d give students and report and/or block them.
j – jaded
It’s hard not to become jaded when you see the amount of amazing ideas some people share; you can end up feeling like you are not good enough, that you don’t have any original ideas, that you don’t work hard enough. Don’t worry, you are doing great. Some people (I was once included in this) work too hard, whether a result of personal desires or workplace demands; they also tend to have few responsibilities outside of work and therefore have the time. Do not feel you have to work harder, longer, more creatively etc. Make the most of twitter by borrowing what you can to reduce your own workload, just remember to give back.
k – knock-on effect
What you discover through twitter has a knock-on effect in your classroom and hopefully school. Be sure to share what you find with others. Perhaps highlight a piece of good practice you’ve stolen from twitter with others as part of department/leadership meetings, as a message at the end of emails or through a weekly bulletin.
l – learn
To get the most from Twitter for CPD purposes, you’ll want to ensure you keep an open mind and are willing to explore/discuss new ideas. Allow yourself to keep learning, keep being challenged. Learn from the experience and make the most of the opportunities to update your understanding of pedagogy, teaching and learning and education.
m – magpie
One of my favourite terms picked up from using Twitter has to be to ‘magpie’. In order words, steal, borrow etc. ideas and inspiration from others. I loved it so much I even set up Magpied Pedagogy to try and collate as many of the fantastic ideas out there. It’s even a term I use in the classroom ‘time to magpie’ – students fly around the room stealing ideas from others before returning to their own work and adding to it.
n – network
Twitter provides a great opportunity to network, the opportunity to interact with others from both within and outside the teaching profession, to exchange information, ideas and debate as well as developing professional and/or social contacts.
o – offer
As with engaging with others and sharing your own work it’s also important to offer ideas, advice and resources if possible when others ask. By doing so we reduce each others workload that little bit and help to develop the community of educators; it’s a kind of pay-it-forward scheme.
p – PLN
A PLN is a personal learning network; this being the connections you create with those that help you to develop and learn in a professional (and possibly personal) context. A PLN is about sharing ideas and resources, collaborating and learning.
q – question
There are so many resources and ideas being shared, it’s hard to know what to use sometimes. Ensure you always question the purpose, the application and how applicable is it to your learners. I must admit that initially I tried to use everything I saw and liked; but that lasted all of a few months when I realised a) it was unsustainable b) they weren’t always suitable for my learners/my style. There’s no harm in trying new things, just don’t try everything. Question them to decipher what’s worthwhile for you and your classes.
r – research
I could spend hours on twitter researching particular areas of focus there’s so much out there; I often find it quicker to find research material on twitter than on google. Simply type in the search bar your topic and you’ll find either people involved in the field of study, hashtags or tweets associated. From there I find what’s relevant and take it from there; sometimes it might be taking the name of a university lecturer from the field and then googling them to find their work or even just simply opening a link from a tweet. Also you can easily ask others for pointers on where to find relevant research and information.
s – stand up
Sometimes when we are stuck in a classroom/office for the majority of the day, it’s hard to feel like we are a community of professionals with a voice. Use twitter to stand up for what you believe in. The more noise we make as a collective, the further the message spreads. I personally do a lot on teacher wellbeing, workload and mental health as a result of my own experiences, I know others stand up for LGBT rights, minorities and women in education.
t – tweachers
Once you start tweeting about education and teaching, you officially become part of the community of ‘Tweachers’, I’m afraid there’s no fanfare or certificates but you can take pride in the knowledge that you have joined the ranks of teachers that tweet.
u – Universities
Follow universities on twitter for education and subject specific academic research, articles and links. They are a great source of information to develop you pedagogical and subject knowledge.
v – visits
I know of a number of educators, teachers and school leaders that have organised school visits via twitter. Twitter is useful for connecting to teachers and schools; seeing the good practice out there and creating connections. Make the most of it by creating networks and communities with schools in your area or further afield.
w – wellbeing
Twitter has been my biggest support for managing my own wellbeing. I got involved with #Teacher5aday back in December 2015; it has given me a support network as well as incredible friendships. It’s important to look after your wellbeing (that includes not spending hours on Twitter looking for teaching ideas), allow your twitter friendships to support you to make sure you switch off from work.
x – x-factor teachers
This one can be both positive and negative. You can end up feeling a little z-list with all the great work being shared but remember its social media, regularly users highlight the great stuff in their life rather than the mundane day-to-day. Also look out for those x-factor tweachers, the ones that think they have a noteworthy talent and that everyone should listen or do as they do. It’s not good for you mind or soul. Remember not to compare yourself with them.
y – year-round CPD
Twitter for CPD is year-round, really you can’t get away from it so try to be ‘strict’ with it, otherwise you can constantly be thinking about work. Disconnect from twitter now and then or at least disconnect from the education based conversations, remember you are a human first, a teacher second. But whilst we are on the note of year-round CPD, check out this list of CPD events through out the year from Pete SandersonEdu-Conference National Calendar.
z -ZZZZs….
Too many teachers are burning out. You must look after yourself. Beg, borrow and share resources on twitter; by doing so you reduce your workload and the workload of others (here’s an article I contributed towards on the topic). Avoid burnout by asking for help, ideas and resources; share what you can and make sure you get plenty of ZZZZs (so avoid twitter before bed, it’s too easy to get caught up in something).

What would you add to encourage other teachers to use twitter for CPD?
Your thoughts are welcomed.

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities shares… 5 strategies for developing independent learners

mrs humanities shares

Are we doing too much for our learners? This question has plagued me a lot recently.

I’ve seen hundreds of fabulous resources that take the hard work out of learning for our students. That remove the responsibility from students to teacher. That take the independence from the learning process. That make them dependent on us, their teachers.

Now I’m sure many people will argue with me that it’s a result of increased scrutiny; the unrealistic performance management targets; the use of target grades etc. Which are all completely valid arguments and I agree, but it still scares me that so many teachers are doing so much for their students. Things that take away their students responsibility and independence in the learning process.

Things like case study guides with all of the content students need, completed knowledge organisers, again with all of the content students need. Completed exam questions, so students can learn to replicate. Revision booklets again with all of the content. It all worries me.

I’ve never hidden the fact that I facilitate learning, that my aim as a teacher is to make my students as independent as possible in my classroom and in their learning. That I want my students to leave school being able to learn for themselves; to be able to critically analyse and evaluate; to design and create; to research effectively; to be responsible for their own learning; to want to continue learning after compulsory education.

I’ve created numerous posts on developing independent learners such as these

Developing Independent Learners – Help Yourself Display and Resource Station

Developing Independent Learners – Seating Plans

Developing Independent Learners – Attempts at Flipped Learning

Developing Independent Learners

Developing Independent Learners – Independent Learning Projects

Developing Independence in the Humanities Classroom

Although my practices have evolved and changed over the last 4-5 years, developing independent learners is still at the core of my teaching.

Some ways I approach ‘developing independence’ are as follows

1 // ‘Help Yourself’ stations

I’m a big believer that students should learn to take responsibility for their progress and learning. That we should facilitate them in any way we can to help and support them but at the end of the day, we don’t sit their exams. That’s down to them.

Here’s some further reading from Tom Rogers if you’re interested

Anyway, whilst I do differentiate for students individual needs I also believe that students need to be able to identify when they need support and should develop the ability to be able to work out for themselves what that support looks like.

Therefore in my classrooms for the last 4 years, there have been a ‘help yourself’ areas or stations. This is an area where students can find resources that can support them in a variety of ways. For instance students can find sentence starter mats to help get them started with a variety of extended writing tasks, topic platemats/knowledge organisers that provide the key content of topics (see below for more details), blank maps, atlases, peer and self assessment sheets, note taking templates, timeline sheets and the list goes on. All of which students can help themselves to in order to help them with the tasks they are undertaking.

Initially I will direct students to particular support and overtime encourage them to help themselves to the resource they feel appropriate. Usually as students start to recognise their areas of ‘weakness’ they can independently select the appropriate support strategy.

Read more on ‘Help Yourself’ stations in my original post here.

2 // Project Breakdown

I start year 7 with a homework project that is broken up into smaller chunks, each with their own deadline. We cover map and atlas skills to ensure all students embark on the rest of their geographical learning with the basic skills required.

Student’s therefore complete a project as homework over the course of the first term on a European country of their choice. Each chunk of the project fits with the work covered in class allowing the students to demonstrate the skills and knowledge they developed in the lesson.

The breaking down of the project into chunks develops students time management skills and teaches them to break down a project over time to ensure they do not complete other projects just before the deadline.

Over time these breakdowns are removed so students can independently carry out projects without the haste of

3 // Blank or Basic Knowledge Organisers (AKA Placemats, Knowledge Mats etc.)

I’ve seen knowledge organisers with the entire topic on one sheet. All the content a student needs to know. It makes me question why the student needs to listen, to participate in the lesson, to do the tasks set by their teacher. If they have everything they need to know in front of them, surely it encourages students to ‘switch off’. Some may argue that students have KOs in order to then apply the knowledge, but I fear this reduces their ability to retrieve information.

I prefer to use KOs or placemats as they were originally intruduced to me to provide a basic outline of the content students generally struggle with.

For Geography for instance I often find students confuse the 3 tectonic plate boundaries and find it hard to visualise convection currents.

placemat.png

In History it tended to be the sequence of events, names and places.

placemat History.png

Therefore I created a basic visual summary for my students to collect if they so desired. These mats would consist again of the very basics to support my learners.

I also encourage students to create their own KOs at KS5 and hope to implement this into KS4 in due course. In order for my KS5 students to do this I’ve created KO sheets with blank boxes, except for a question or statement in which they respond to in order to collate the knowledge they need to demonstrate thus retrieving and revising the content for use later on.

KO ks5

KO ks5 2

4 // Revision

I refuse to give students the content they need to know in the form of a booklet or similar in order to revise from. Sorry, but they should get that from lessons, why else bother going to lessons if it’s not to learn the content?!

Instead for I provide a variety of resources to support my students.

To start with for each topic students receive an AfL grids with an outline of the topic content. At the start of the topic students self-assess their prior knowledge and then at the end their understanding of the topic in order to highlight the areas for future revision.

Then in regards to revision of the content I’ve created how to revise guides to help students to develop an ongoing approach to revision as well as teaching retrieval strategies and exam technique in class.

In addition I’ve created case study templates for students to complete to summarise the case studies and examples explored. To support revision these have been combined into a case study and exam question booklet so students can also apply the content to exam style questions.

gcse revision

All these strategies require my students to do the work and be responsible for their own learning and progress. I’ve provided the resources, taught the content and given them the support they need to succeed but it’s up to them to actually learn what they need to know for the exam.

5 // Inquiry/Enquiry based learning

At my school we have a real ethos for developing inquirers. I love that we do loads of inquiry based learning across the school. Students get to question, research and develop their curiosity throughout.

In KS3, at the start of each unit, my students write down questions. These questions influence my planning, the resources I use and the lesson objectives over the course of the topic. Students are the driving force of the lesson content. I teach the same year group the same topic to reach the same outcomes but the approach varies dependent on the class questions.

Now that I’m settled in my ‘new’ school for a full year, I’ve seen the progression students make through this approach. Enquiry truly develops their curiosity and interest; they constantly challenge me to further my subject knowledge and keep it up to date as their questions get us exploring aspects I’ve missed in the past or thought not relevant when planning schemes of work.

Through their questioning comes exploration, analysis and evaluation; deepening their understanding and I love it.

How do you develop independence in your learners? Feel free to leave a comment or get in touch.

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities shares… 5 note taking strategies

mrs humanities shares

One of my aims for the coming September is to start the school year with my sixth form students looking at different approaches to note taking.

At present my common experience is that students write down the majority of the information on the board whilst adding a few additional notes from our verbal discussion. Not that there is anything wrong with this but I feel confident I can help them to create better notes and use class time more effectively.

Therefore I’ve been doing some research in note taking strategies and thought I’d share a few with you. All of these I will be exploring with my year 12 students in September before helping them to choose a suitable approach.

1 // Cornell method

The page is split into 3 sections, prompts, notes and summary.

cornell2

Prompts – key terminology from the lesson, questions, dates, names etc. that can be reviewed at a later date

Notes – main notes are taken here

Summary – students review the notes and resources after the lesson and summarise. Key points are highlighted ready for revision.

cornell example

2 // Outline method

With this method, students indent their notes with each step becoming more specific. They can split the page into three columns like so.

indent

General information – brief, concise notes on the general content of the lesson

Specifics – concise notes on the specifics of the lesson

Details and examples – facts, stats and specifics to be included here along with any examples or comparisons given

The end product may look something like this…

indent example

or this…

indent 2.png

3 // Highlight and annotate

Before the lesson students will print off the PowerPoint slides or download the PowerPoint to their personal device if they use one. Then quite simply, rather than trying to copy down notes from the board and resources that are provided in advance, students simply listen and annotate them. All too often I find students copying down information that I’ve already provided them with online in advance of the lesson, therefore more time can be spent of using lesson time to deepen their knowledge and understanding through higher thinking tasks, debate and discussion.

annotate.png

4 // Flow based method

The flow based method requires students to write down the main ideas rather than paragraphs and sentences, similar to mind-mapping. Once initial notes are written down, students connect ideas, concepts and specifics by drawing connecting arrows to associated content, key terms and diagrams. This method forces students to consider the inter-connectivity of what they are learning and bring in knowledge from outside the lesson. This form of note-taking is very personal and demonstrates the students flow of thinking.

flow example

This method can easily be turned into a visual format as well.

5 // During-After method

The during-after method involves students splitting the page into two columns like so.

DA

During – students take notes on the content.

After – students write questions either during or after the lesson to test their understanding of the content after the lesson.

DA example

Final Thoughts

For me the key point of these methods will be that students review their notes after the lesson in some way; whether it be summarising, self-testing or simply reviewing their notes. It’s vital that students use and return to their notes regularly.

Hope you’ve grabbed an idea or two. Feel free to provide further suggestions in the comments.

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Mrs Humanities shares… Subject Specific Teacher Facebook Groups

mrs humanities shares

It was pointed out to me after sharing my last Mrs Humanities shares… post on History Revision Resources that many people share their resources via Facebook groups now instead of other online platforms yet I still speak to people who are completely unaware of this.

In order to inform those that might be interested I’ve collated the variety of Facebook teaching groups in this post to help you find them easily. I imagine this is not an exhaustive list so if you know of others please let me know.

geography

General Geography

// National Geography Department

// UK Geography teachers resource sharing

// Geographypods.com

Geography GCSE

// AQA GCSE Geography Teachers Group

// Edexcel Geography B (9-1) Community

// Edexcel GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// Eduqas geography spec B

// OCR A GCSE Geography

// OCR B GCSE Geography Teachers’ Group

// WJEC and WJEC Eduqas GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// WJEC Geography Teachers

// Edexcel iGCSE Geography

Geography A-Level and IB

// AQA A Level Geography Teachers Group

// OCR Geography AS/A Level Teachers

// Edexcel A Level Geography Teachers Group

// IB DP Geography Teachers Support Group

history

General History

// History Teachers and Those Interested in History Education UK

History GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE History 2016 support group

// Edexcel GCSE History

// New AQA GCSE History 2016

// WJEC/Eduqas GCSE History

// OCR GCSE History A 9-11 support group

// IGCSE History Teachers: Support Group

History A-Level and IB

// Teachers of AQA A level History

// OCR A-Level History support group

// Edexcel A Level History support group

// IBDP History Teachers: Support Group

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General Religious Studies

// Save RE – The Subject Community for RE Professionals

// RE Teachers Forum

Religious Studies GCSE

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Christianity & Islam (Teachers only)

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Teachers & Resources

// Edexcel Religious Studies GCSE

// GCSE Hinduism – Religious Studies – RE/RS Teachers Group

// OCR Gcse Religious Studies First Teach 2016

Religious Studies A-Level

// AQA A-Level Religious Studies 2016

// Edexcel Religious Studies A Level (For Teachers Only)

// Eduqas A-Level Religious Studies Teachers

// OCR A Level Religious Studies H173 and H573 for professionals

// KS5 Buddhism Teachers (AS/A2 Religious Studies)

citizenship

General Citizenship

// Teachers of Secondary PSHE & Citizenship

Citizenship GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE Citizenship Studies

other.png

// PSHE, Collective Worship, RE & Citizenship teacher forum

// PSHE & Careers Teachers Centre

// MYP Individuals and Societies: Teachers’ Support Group

I hope this helps you to connect, share and inspire.

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities shares… 6 Epic History Revision Resources

mrs humanities shares

Following last week’s Mrs Humanities shares… post on geography revision resources I thought I’d collate some of the epic free resources being shared for history. Whilst I may no longer teach history I still like to keep in touch with subject content, good practice and pedagogical developments in the subject. Unfortunately there’s not so much in the way of free revision resources that I could find, so many of these are revision sites with useful material.

So here goes, in no particular order…

1 //  How do we revise for history? from @MrThorntonTeach

This resource is fantastic. Greg has created a history specific help sheet that offers ways to revise within the context of History. The sheet outlines methods with clear ‘how to use in history’ sections, linking to the knowledge and skills GCSE students need.

Download here https://mrthorntonteach.com/2018/02/04/how-do-we-revise-for-history/

2 // Retrieval Practice Grids from @87History

A simple but effective revision strategy that can be used as starter or plenary or even as an activity during revision sessions. Quite simple to construct simply set up the structure and add a range questions that require students to retrieve and recall information from last lesson, last week and even further. A useful revision strategy to recap and revisit subject content.

87lovetoteach.png

More info here http://lovetoteach87.com/2018/01/12/retrieval-practice-challenge-grids-for-the-classroom/

3 // MrAllsopHistory.com from @MrAllsopHistory 

This site is an incredible revision resource for students and teachers alike. When I first started teaching GCSE History, this was one of my go-to sites. So much content for such a wide range of topics across GCSE, A-Level and IB.

allsop.gif

Access here https://www.mrallsophistory.com/revision/

4 // RogersHistory Online Revision Courses from @RogersHistory 

Now I will admit I’ve not accessed the courses myself but I know Tom is a great educator and I have undertaken 2 of his Teacher CPD courses. I imagine the student revision courses are of the same high quality.

 

Access here http://www.rogershistory.com/online-revision-courses

5 // FlippingHistory.net from @FlippingHistory

Flipping History is a set of history lessons from Mr Guiney that can support students with their revision and teachers with their planning. Wide variety of content.

flippedhistory.png

Access here https://www.flippinghistory.net/

6 // History 5 a day from @sehartsmith

I originally saw these as a tweet from @sehartsmith  and thought they needed to be shared so contacted her to see if she would be willing to share them. Luckily for you lot, Sarah has been generous and popped them into a google drive you to access and download. Just click here.

 

I would love to add more resources, but after an extensive search for FREE revision resources I couldn’t find much so if you can point me in the right direction PLEASE do.

Remember resource sharing = reduced workloads.

Best wishes,

Mrs Humanities

 


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Mrs Humanities reviews… ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’.

Mrs Humanities reviews...

In November 2017, I met Mark Harris at a Teach Meet. Since then, I’ve read his book ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’. It’s been an interesting read; much of which I agree with so it’s nice to hear others saying the same thing.

book cover.png

The book starts by exploring the concept of outstanding teaching before discussing planning for progress and lesson design.

As I read the first 3 chapters I found myself highlighting multiple parts to share with my department, to reflect upon or to note for future reference. A lot of the theory I agreed with. In particular I liked the fact that this book recognises that outstanding teachers aren’t outstanding all the time or at everything.

“It’s important to realise that not every lesson you teach will be outstanding, and there is nothing wrong with this.” Mark Harris

Chapter 2 I found of most interest; this chapter explored designing and developing a sequence of lessons. The key focus here is that we should begin with the end in mind to enable us to have a clear vision of the skills and knowledge our students must acquire to be successful. This chapter encourages the reader to reflect on the geographical skills, knowledge and understanding that set the foundations for our subject, courses and curriculum and to consider how assessment can take place.

planning for progress

Figure 2.2 above from page 9 of ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’ summarised effectively the process in which I went through in planning a Humanities curriculum a few years ago. If you are currently renewing or planning a geography curriculum this chapter is really useful.

Chapter 3 then explores lesson planning through a series of stages and highlights the importance of planning for learning rather than how you plan to teach. A key point I never really learnt until my third year of teaching as I designed a new curriculum from scratch. It’s important to learn this early on to maximise the impact of your teaching. New teachers will find this chapter invaluable; improving teachers will find it useful yet the more effective practitioners may find it of little use.

From chapter 4 to chapter 13, I felt this book came into its own with its wide variety of ideas and strategies to develop one’s practice. These chapters look at a variety of good practice associated with questioning, differentiation, geographical enquiry, literacy and numeracy. Later followed by strategies for teaching A level, marking for progress and homework.

Some of my favourites included…

  • the chapter on ‘Marking for Progress’ (No surprise!) and the idea of the progress wheel which pretty much a simplified version of my before and after topic reflection sheets.
  • the introduction to flipped learning and the ‘Flipped Learning sheet’ which could easily be created and adapted to one’s desired uses.
  • the chapter on ‘How to create curiosity and teach geography through enquiry’ which takes the reader through the process of creating an enquiry.

Whilst I felt a lot of it I already applied to my practice. Overall there’s plenty to influence the practice of the newbie teacher or the improving teacher; there’s a lot to be learnt from the book and plenty to inspire.

It’s a book I’ll encourage my department to read.

To grab your own copy click here.

If you’ve read it, share your thoughts.

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities shares… 10 Great Geography Revision Resources

mrs humanities shares

It’s that time of year when teachers and students alike start loosing their minds…. the run-up to exam season. In no particular order then…

1 // Geography 5 a day from @Jennnnnn_x 

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/new-aqa-revision-9-1-geog-5-a-day-11742490

A nice set of resources that encourage students to return to their prior learning; easily adaptable and simple to use. These can easily be set as a starter activity or homework.

geog your memory

2 // Revision Clock from @teachgeogblog 

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/revision-clock-11141536

Whilst this resource is not content specific, it’s a simple way to revise. The template breaks an hour down into 12×5 minute slots.  Students revise a sub-topic for 5 minutes, making notes in the appropriate chunk of the clock. When I’ve used this before one challenge has been having the entire hour to complete it, in order to overcome this they actually only spend 50 minutes note taking and 2 of the 5 minute sections they fill with key terms or facts, stats and specifics as they review the content.

clock

3 // Memory Geoggers from @InternetGeog

https://www.internetgeography.net/memory-geoggers/

A take on @Jennnnnn_x  Geography 5 aday (aka as Geog your Memory) there are a growing number of sheets being added on a regular basis.

memory geogger

4 // Revision Pizza with information toppings from @GeoNewbz 

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/revision-pizza-with-information-toppings-11794366

Quite a different approach to revision, the resources provided here help the student to summarise a topic by organising the ‘toppings’ into the correct slice of the pizza with each slice representing a part of the topic. This can be easily adapted to be questions that the students then go on to answer.

5  // Geography Skills 5 minute challenge from @K_M_Campbell

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/geography-skills-5-minute-challenge-11780484

A range of skill based activities which can easily be used as starters tasks to review prior learning and to develop skills.

 6 // Geog your Memory… skills and content based exam questions from @MissASearle

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/geog-your-memory-skills-and-content-based-exam-questions-11823212

This resource provides students with the opportunity to refine their exam technique and identify gaps in their knowledge for the Eduqas B 9-1 spec. A tracker is included which shows the source of each question so that you or the students can access the mark scheme.

geog your memory amy

7// Videos from @timeforgeog 

https://timeforgeography.co.uk/

A variety of videos on a range of topics, suitable content for all exam boards. You need to sign up to watch the videos but they are free to watch.

videos.png

8 // A question a day from @Geoisamazing 

Paper 1 – https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/new-spec-aqa-a-question-a-day-paper-1-11740889

An easy to amend question a day calendar with questions based on AQA paper 1; good for retrieval practice. Hopefully a paper 2 one might be added in due course.

question a day

9 // GCSE Case Study and Exam Question Revision Booklet from @MrsHumanities

https://mrshumanities.com/2018/01/29/resource-gcse-case-study-and-exam-question-revision-booklet/

This is a resource I created recently to support independence in the revision process. Students have a summary template for each case study from the AQA Geography specification and questions that follow. Students fill in the summary templates and use them to answer the questions provided.

10 // GCSE 9-1 Geography Exam Practice Booklet from @MrTomlinsonGeog 

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/gcse-9-1-geography-exam-practice-booklet-11829054

This resource is an adaption of my AQA GCSE Case Study and Exam Question Booklet. Students are provided with the case study information and given questions to apply their knowledge and understanding too.

Hope you find a revision resource of use from the collection.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Mrs Humanities shares… 5 Must Show Films for the Humanities

mrs humanities shares

As I watched a documentary in preparation for a lesson, it got me thinking about some of my favourites beyond the usuals such as An Inconvenient Truth, Blue Planet etc.

1 // A plastic Ocean

A very on-topic documentary about the issue of plastic in our oceans. The documentary starts with an insight into Whales before it starts to discuss the issue of plastic waste, the consequences and solutions.  At times it’s gross, others moments gob smacking; if this doesn’t get students engaged with the issue, I don’t know what will.

2 // He Named Me Malala

I cry EVERY time I watch this. The film tells the miraculous story of Malala and her fight for girl’s education. I can’t imagine there are many people that have not heard of Malala, but I’m sure there are many that haven’t watched or read her story. The documentary is excellent to demonstrate the global inequalities in education, development and society.

3 // Food Inc

One for the older year groups, the film explores commercial farming in the US with particular focus on the detrimental impacts of intensive agriculture on the environment, animals and employees. Not suitable for the squirmish or maybe it’s just me.

4 // The Age of Stupid

I love this film; it’s part documentary, part drama that explores the question Why didn’t we stop climate change when we had the chance?” from 2055. Using science and some worse case scenarios it documents the potential impacts of climate change.

5 //  Suffragette

This historical period drama effectively documents the women’s suffrage movement through the story of the fictional character Maud Watts. With numerous references to real-life events and people this drama explores the role of women in social change at the beginning of the 20th Century.  There are some great resources here

 

What are your favourites? Common or more unique?

Feel free to share your thoughts by leaving a comment.

Mrs Humanities

 

 


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Mrs Humanities shares… 5 simple homework strategies

mrs humanities shares

I hate to say it but on many occasions I have set homework just for the sake of it. All of my schools have had a homework policy of sorts i.e. students must receive so many minutes of homework a week. But if students are going to spend 7 hours in school and then complete homework as well it must be worthwhile.

This year I’ve been trying to improve the homework I set to limit the stress experienced by my students. These are some of the techniques I’m using.

1 // Finishing Classwork

It really is that simple. I want my students to have a full set of notes or the ability to be able to complete a task to the best of their ability. To ensure this I regularly set them homework to complete the task or tasks they’ve been undertaking in class. For those that finish in the lesson, there are stretch and challenge tasks to push them further or they spend time reviewing their work and applying it to an offered exam question.

The benefit of this is that my students work hard in lesson, but they know that if they’ve not had time to fully complete something or have needed help and guidance in the lesson and have been delayed in completing their work, they have the time to get it finished.

finishing classwork

2 // Exam Style Questions

Mainly used with exam classes, but occasionally with Key Stage 3. The use of exam style questions for homework is that they encourage students to review their notes and apply their understanding.

We regularly go through exam answer structure for 6 and 9 mark questions, plan the answer and discuss the content. Setting questions for homework then leaves students to apply their learning independently, the use of mark schemes in the hand in lesson then allows for students to self or peer assess before submitting. In order to assess students understanding I also set shorter exam style questions for homework to ensure they regularly apply their learning and develop their exam technique.

esq

3 // Learning Journals

This is a technique I recently introduced with Key Stage 3 so currently still in the trial stage. The concept is that students will reflect, summarise and explore the topic. I’ve set out the end of topic assessed piece of work with the students already so they are aware of the purpose of the learning journal and have allowed them to take whichever route they wish with it. Here’s an example of the instructions I’ve given.

learning journal

At parent’s evening I share the idea with parent’s and they loved the concept. I explained that students weren’t prescribed in the format in which they wish to present their learning journal it can be anything from recording their learning, questions and feelings on the topic in the back of their books to something a bit more creative such as a scrapbook or mood board. They only need to spend 20 minutes on it a week, but should use it to direct their interest into the final assessed piece of work.
Learning Journals

4 // Summary Picture

I don’t set this homework too often but I do find it effective as an insight into my learners understanding and thoughts on a topic. It is quite simple, after a lesson or series of lessons students have to find, take or draw a picture that summarises what they’ve learnt, the answer to a question or how they’ve felt about the topic of study. For example when studying global issues I ask students to find a picture that represents how they feel at the end of the topic about the issues facing our planet and society, they have to write a justification to support the image and we share these with the class. Some bring in images that represent doom and gloom whilst others have brought in images that represent hope and solutions. It’s always insightful to hear their thoughts, opinions and probably more so the justifications for their pictures.

summary picture

Alternatively you can ask students to reflect on their learning journey and bring a picture in that represents that.

5 // Self-Marking Quiz

Now these can take a little time to set up, but once done you can use them time and time again. There are numerous platforms that you can use such as:
SAM Learning
Google forms
Show My Homework
Moodle
EdModo

These are great as they assess students understanding of the knowledge and provides them with immediate feedback. As their teacher you can then look at their scores, their errors and plan appropriately before the lesson to cover misconceptions.

Self marking quizzes

 

What homework strategies do you use regularly?

Feel free to share them in the comments.

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities shares… 5 simple feedback strategies

mrs humanities shares

1 // Feedback Grids

Not only do feedback grids allow you to live mark, they provide students with success criteria. Get your grids made up before students undertake an extended piece of work; you then know what you expect from your students and they do too. As students work, visit them and discuss what they have achieved so far and tick off or highlight. Highlight through a dot, steps or other way the criteria you want them to focus on next.

Here’s an example…

levelled work feedback grid

I would simply highlight in yellow the achieved criteria and during live marking would put a dot next to the content I wanted them to focus on next. Once the task was complete, I would highlight in pink the ‘you could improve by…’ criteria and give the students some time to make these improvements.

2 // Dot marking

There are a vareity of ways you can use dot marking. Firstly you can use it as you live mark, put a dot on the students work where an error or misconception exists; students then have to try to work it out or are given verbal guidance from the teacher. Another approach can be that different colours indicate different successes or areas for improvement as shown here by @LDNHumsTeacher .

dot marking code

3 // ACE feedback

The teacher take on ACE peer assessment. Quite simply the teacher ticks and flicks successes, puts a question mark for mistakes or misconceptions and an asterick for an extension. The teacher can either write comments and questions in the book or write these for the whole class to see and share them on the board. These maybe indicated specifically to the student through codes.

ace teacher

4 // Whole class feedback

As I’ve shared many times before, whole class feedback is exactly that feedback given to the whole class. Students maybe required to write relevant comments into their books or act on specific feedback shared with the class. For more information on whole class feedback check out this post.

5 // Highlight and Improvehighlight and improve

Really is that simple, highlight work that could be improved. Use alongside verbal feedback, dot marking, ACE feedback or what ever other strategies you wish to use. Encourage students to reflect on their work and identify errors or improvements for themselves.

Mrs Humanities