Mrs Humanities

Because I'm married to the job


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Mrs Humanities shares… 5 note taking strategies

mrs humanities shares

One of my aims for the coming September is to start the school year with my sixth form students looking at different approaches to note taking.

At present my common experience is that students write down the majority of the information on the board whilst adding a few additional notes from our verbal discussion. Not that there is anything wrong with this but I feel confident I can help them to create better notes and use class time more effectively.

Therefore I’ve been doing some research in note taking strategies and thought I’d share a few with you. All of these I will be exploring with my year 12 students in September before helping them to choose a suitable approach.

1 // Cornell method

The page is split into 3 sections, prompts, notes and summary.

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Prompts – key terminology from the lesson, questions, dates, names etc. that can be reviewed at a later date

Notes – main notes are taken here

Summary – students review the notes and resources after the lesson and summarise. Key points are highlighted ready for revision.

cornell example

2 // Outline method

With this method, students indent their notes with each step becoming more specific. They can split the page into three columns like so.

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General information – brief, concise notes on the general content of the lesson

Specifics – concise notes on the specifics of the lesson

Details and examples – facts, stats and specifics to be included here along with any examples or comparisons given

The end product may look something like this…

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or this…

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3 // Highlight and annotate

Before the lesson students will print off the PowerPoint slides or download the PowerPoint to their personal device if they use one. Then quite simply, rather than trying to copy down notes from the board and resources that are provided in advance, students simply listen and annotate them. All too often I find students copying down information that I’ve already provided them with online in advance of the lesson, therefore more time can be spent of using lesson time to deepen their knowledge and understanding through higher thinking tasks, debate and discussion.

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4 // Flow based method

The flow based method requires students to write down the main ideas rather than paragraphs and sentences, similar to mind-mapping. Once initial notes are written down, students connect ideas, concepts and specifics by drawing connecting arrows to associated content, key terms and diagrams. This method forces students to consider the inter-connectivity of what they are learning and bring in knowledge from outside the lesson. This form of note-taking is very personal and demonstrates the students flow of thinking.

flow example

This method can easily be turned into a visual format as well.

5 // During-After method

The during-after method involves students splitting the page into two columns like so.

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During – students take notes on the content.

After – students write questions either during or after the lesson to test their understanding of the content after the lesson.

DA example

Final Thoughts

For me the key point of these methods will be that students review their notes after the lesson in some way; whether it be summarising, self-testing or simply reviewing their notes. It’s vital that students use and return to their notes regularly.

Hope you’ve grabbed an idea or two. Feel free to provide further suggestions in the comments.

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My Wellbeing Hero

my wellbeing hero

There are some people you meet in the world that have a lasting effect on you; some positive, others well not quite so positive. To celebrate the amazing people out there helping us all to look after ourselves, I’m starting a short series of #MyWellbeingHero posts.

I thought I’d start with someone that has had profound an effect on me, I won’t say who they are as there are some personal details but they will know it is them.

Who is your wellbeing hero?

We will call her Ms A…. A for awesome.

Give 3 words to describe them.

Inspiring. Brave. Positive.

How have they helped to improve your wellbeing?

This person makes me think. They inspire me to look after my wellbeing and that of others. They’ve helped me to see the impact #Teacher5adayBuddyBox has had and makes the work involved totally worth every single minute of it.

What makes…

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Resource – Describing routes using maps

This resource is one I created during my PGCE back in 2010-11 and I think I’ve used it with year 7 every year since. It’s one of those resources that is always applicable.

It’s quite a simple activity. Students are given a map, key and task sheet.

The task sheet provides a cops and robbers scenario with descriptions being provided by a helicopter overhead. Students have to follow the suspects around the map and fill in the missing information or select the appropriate information from the options provided in order to catch the suspects. The task sheet has been provided as a word document so you can easily amend to suit your students.

To grab a copy of this resource click here. 

download here

Hope you find the resource of use.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Resource – Why did Parliament turn on Charles I?

origins

As part of the themetic topic on Law and Order I developed at my last school, we explored the origins of Parliament. After having looking at the origins the students explored why and how Parliament turned on Charles I.

The students spent a couple of lessons on the topic in order to uncover the cause, consequence and significance of Charles’s execution in 1649.

They started with a card sort, which they used to develop an interpretation of events.

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Students read, sorted and linked the cards by writing on the tables with whiteboard pens to create their interpretations.

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This was then followed up with a piece of extended writing which involved them using the card sort, our discussions and their annotations to write 3 paragraphs on the cause, consequence and significance of Charles’s execution.

You can download the resources here, along with some resources for LA students.

download here

Hope you can make use of the resources.

Mrs Humanities

 

 


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News – #TMGeographyIcons Website

geogicons

Behind the scenes lots of work has been going into organising the first and only full-day TeachMeet for Geography teachers by Geography teachers.

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I’m so excited with what we are putting together for you. We’ve 2 great key note speakers, one is Alan Parkinson (@GeoBlogs), the second we are yet to announce. 

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The next big piece of news is why I’m writing this post. We are finally ready to go live with our #TMGeographyIcons website.

On the site you will find key information including bios of our speakers and TeachMeet presenters, location details and all of our upcoming news.

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There’s plenty to look forward to, so make sure you bookmark the first #TMGeographyIcons website.

You can also keep up-to-date with any announcements by following us on Twitter.

Hope to meet many of you on Saturday 23rd June.

Mrs Humanities

 

 

 

 


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Resource – Origins of Parliament Assessed Task

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When I set up the Humanities department at my last school, I decided to that students would study thematic topics; One of those was Law and Order.

Students in year 9 explored the origins of government and parliament from 1066.

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As part of the topic on Law and Order students explored a variety of historical events that led to the development of parliament and government here in the UK as well as the consequences. This was later followed by looking at law and crime in Victorian Britain.

foragainstroyaltablegoodbadPart way through the topic students had a simple recall test and an assessed extended writing task.

 

 

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The assessed extended writing task I favoured. Students got to explore their understanding of the topic content drawing upon their understanding of cause, consequence and significance.

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The feedback sheet looked like this, to feedback I used one colour highlighter to identify successes and another for next steps to work on during feedforward time.

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This was then followed by the English Civil war and a mystery inquiry on why did Parliament turn against the King? We finished the topic with a look at modern day.

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Students came away with a thorough understanding of how and why parliament and governance has developed.

To access the assessed task shown above click here. 

download here

If you’d like the resources as well for the topic, get in touch. I’ve magpied a variety of resources from a range of free sources such as the UK governments education pages so don’t want to publicly share them.

Hope you find the ideas of some use.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Resource – 1066 and all that

1066

I’ve just been going through some of my resources I realised I’ve a lot of history resources I’m unlikely to use any time soon but I don’t want them to just there on my computer.

This scheme of work starts by looking at key events between 410 AD and 1066 before going on to explore life in Anglo-Saxon Britain. The topic then goes on to look at the contenders for the throne, the Battle of Stamford Bridge and on to the Battle of Hastings. Finishing with the Harrying of the North after an assessment.

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Each lesson has a range of resources suited for mixed ability and ability set classes. When I taught these lessons I was teaching in a school with a wide range of abilities from students that could barely read and write to students that had moved out of grammar schools. Classes were in ability sets and the work created to suit their varying needs and abilities.

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There are a wide range of activities from timelines to historical detectives; campaigns to extended writing tasks.  As well as a wide selection of support material.

 

The lessons use a range of resources that I have both created from scratch and adapted from freely available resources over the years. I can’t credit any work I’ve magpied since I don’t know the sources after having used and amended them over two years ago. If you see anything that belongs to you please don’t hesitate to let me know and I will either acknowledge you or remove it.

To access the resources click here.

download here

Hope they can be of some use as springboard for lesson planning.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Mrs Humanities shares… Subject Specific Teacher Facebook Groups

mrs humanities shares

It was pointed out to me after sharing my last Mrs Humanities shares… post on History Revision Resources that many people share their resources via Facebook groups now instead of other online platforms yet I still speak to people who are completely unaware of this.

In order to inform those that might be interested I’ve collated the variety of Facebook teaching groups in this post to help you find them easily. I imagine this is not an exhaustive list so if you know of others please let me know.

geography

General Geography

// National Geography Department

// UK Geography teachers resource sharing

// Geographypods.com

Geography GCSE

// AQA GCSE Geography Teachers Group

// Edexcel Geography B (9-1) Community

// Edexcel GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// Eduqas geography spec B

// OCR A GCSE Geography

// OCR B GCSE Geography Teachers’ Group

// WJEC and WJEC Eduqas GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// WJEC Geography Teachers

// Edexcel iGCSE Geography

Geography A-Level and IB

// AQA A Level Geography Teachers Group

// OCR Geography AS/A Level Teachers

// Edexcel A Level Geography Teachers Group

// IB DP Geography Teachers Support Group

history

General History

// History Teachers and Those Interested in History Education UK

History GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE History 2016 support group

// Edexcel GCSE History

// New AQA GCSE History 2016

// WJEC/Eduqas GCSE History

// OCR GCSE History A 9-11 support group

// IGCSE History Teachers: Support Group

History A-Level and IB

// Teachers of AQA A level History

// OCR A-Level History support group

// Edexcel A Level History support group

// IBDP History Teachers: Support Group

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General Religious Studies

// Save RE – The Subject Community for RE Professionals

// RE Teachers Forum

Religious Studies GCSE

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Christianity & Islam (Teachers only)

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Teachers & Resources

// Edexcel Religious Studies GCSE

// GCSE Hinduism – Religious Studies – RE/RS Teachers Group

// OCR Gcse Religious Studies First Teach 2016

Religious Studies A-Level

// AQA A-Level Religious Studies 2016

// Edexcel Religious Studies A Level (For Teachers Only)

// Eduqas A-Level Religious Studies Teachers

// OCR A Level Religious Studies H173 and H573 for professionals

// KS5 Buddhism Teachers (AS/A2 Religious Studies)

citizenship

General Citizenship

// Teachers of Secondary PSHE & Citizenship

Citizenship GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE Citizenship Studies

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// PSHE, Collective Worship, RE & Citizenship teacher forum

// PSHE & Careers Teachers Centre

// MYP Individuals and Societies: Teachers’ Support Group

I hope this helps you to connect, share and inspire.

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities shares… 6 Epic History Revision Resources

mrs humanities shares

Following last week’s Mrs Humanities shares… post on geography revision resources I thought I’d collate some of the epic free resources being shared for history. Whilst I may no longer teach history I still like to keep in touch with subject content, good practice and pedagogical developments in the subject. Unfortunately there’s not so much in the way of free revision resources that I could find, so many of these are revision sites with useful material.

So here goes, in no particular order…

1 //  How do we revise for history? from @MrThorntonTeach

This resource is fantastic. Greg has created a history specific help sheet that offers ways to revise within the context of History. The sheet outlines methods with clear ‘how to use in history’ sections, linking to the knowledge and skills GCSE students need.

Download here https://mrthorntonteach.com/2018/02/04/how-do-we-revise-for-history/

2 // Retrieval Practice Grids from @87History

A simple but effective revision strategy that can be used as starter or plenary or even as an activity during revision sessions. Quite simple to construct simply set up the structure and add a range questions that require students to retrieve and recall information from last lesson, last week and even further. A useful revision strategy to recap and revisit subject content.

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More info here http://lovetoteach87.com/2018/01/12/retrieval-practice-challenge-grids-for-the-classroom/

3 // MrAllsopHistory.com from @MrAllsopHistory 

This site is an incredible revision resource for students and teachers alike. When I first started teaching GCSE History, this was one of my go-to sites. So much content for such a wide range of topics across GCSE, A-Level and IB.

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Access here https://www.mrallsophistory.com/revision/

4 // RogersHistory Online Revision Courses from @RogersHistory 

Now I will admit I’ve not accessed the courses myself but I know Tom is a great educator and I have undertaken 2 of his Teacher CPD courses. I imagine the student revision courses are of the same high quality.

 

Access here http://www.rogershistory.com/online-revision-courses

5 // FlippingHistory.net from @FlippingHistory

Flipping History is a set of history lessons from Mr Guiney that can support students with their revision and teachers with their planning. Wide variety of content.

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Access here https://www.flippinghistory.net/

6 // History 5 a day from @sehartsmith

I originally saw these as a tweet from @sehartsmith  and thought they needed to be shared so contacted her to see if she would be willing to share them. Luckily for you lot, Sarah has been generous and popped them into a google drive you to access and download. Just click here.

 

I would love to add more resources, but after an extensive search for FREE revision resources I couldn’t find much so if you can point me in the right direction PLEASE do.

Remember resource sharing = reduced workloads.

Best wishes,

Mrs Humanities

 


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Mrs Humanities reviews… ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’.

Mrs Humanities reviews...

In November 2017, I met Mark Harris at a Teach Meet. Since then, I’ve read his book ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’. It’s been an interesting read; much of which I agree with so it’s nice to hear others saying the same thing.

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The book starts by exploring the concept of outstanding teaching before discussing planning for progress and lesson design.

As I read the first 3 chapters I found myself highlighting multiple parts to share with my department, to reflect upon or to note for future reference. A lot of the theory I agreed with. In particular I liked the fact that this book recognises that outstanding teachers aren’t outstanding all the time or at everything.

“It’s important to realise that not every lesson you teach will be outstanding, and there is nothing wrong with this.” Mark Harris

Chapter 2 I found of most interest; this chapter explored designing and developing a sequence of lessons. The key focus here is that we should begin with the end in mind to enable us to have a clear vision of the skills and knowledge our students must acquire to be successful. This chapter encourages the reader to reflect on the geographical skills, knowledge and understanding that set the foundations for our subject, courses and curriculum and to consider how assessment can take place.

planning for progress

Figure 2.2 above from page 9 of ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’ summarised effectively the process in which I went through in planning a Humanities curriculum a few years ago. If you are currently renewing or planning a geography curriculum this chapter is really useful.

Chapter 3 then explores lesson planning through a series of stages and highlights the importance of planning for learning rather than how you plan to teach. A key point I never really learnt until my third year of teaching as I designed a new curriculum from scratch. It’s important to learn this early on to maximise the impact of your teaching. New teachers will find this chapter invaluable; improving teachers will find it useful yet the more effective practitioners may find it of little use.

From chapter 4 to chapter 13, I felt this book came into its own with its wide variety of ideas and strategies to develop one’s practice. These chapters look at a variety of good practice associated with questioning, differentiation, geographical enquiry, literacy and numeracy. Later followed by strategies for teaching A level, marking for progress and homework.

Some of my favourites included…

  • the chapter on ‘Marking for Progress’ (No surprise!) and the idea of the progress wheel which pretty much a simplified version of my before and after topic reflection sheets.
  • the introduction to flipped learning and the ‘Flipped Learning sheet’ which could easily be created and adapted to one’s desired uses.
  • the chapter on ‘How to create curiosity and teach geography through enquiry’ which takes the reader through the process of creating an enquiry.

Whilst I felt a lot of it I already applied to my practice. Overall there’s plenty to influence the practice of the newbie teacher or the improving teacher; there’s a lot to be learnt from the book and plenty to inspire.

It’s a book I’ll encourage my department to read.

To grab your own copy click here.

If you’ve read it, share your thoughts.

Mrs Humanities