Mrs Humanities

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Resource – IBDP Geography Self-Assessment Sheets

As part of encouraging learners to take responsibility for their learning, my students are encouraged to make use of self-assessment sheets. The idea behind these sheets comes from my Before and After topic review wheels, which involves students reflecting on their prior knowledge before undertaking the topic and the assessment of their gained knowledge at the end of the topic.

Students are instructed to print a copy of the grid at the start of the topic and to self-assess their prior knowledge in the before column. The content of the grids is directly lifted from the IBDP 2019 Geography Specification, but could easily be amended to suit any exam specification whether it be at KS4 or 5.

coasts

As students work complete the topic, they are given exam style questions from past papers and ones we have written ourselves. After reading their feedback they complete the progress table, set themselves a target and then put the date or page number of the location with evidence that they have met their target and acted on feedback.

In addition students are given a case study and example summary sheet, in order to help students to bring together their understanding of the case studies and examples studied. Students simply have to summarise the key points in their table. Effective for instilling content. summary sheet

Now I do check the self-assessment sheets are used however the summary sheets are a tool to support students in their studies. If they choose not to use it, that is up to them but the support is given.

If you teach IBDP Geography you can find the resources here, to download a blank template for editing to suit other exam specifications click here.

How do you encourage students to reflect on their learning?

Mrs Humanities


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Resource – AQA Geography AfL Grids

To encourage student responsibility for their learning and progress I use assessment for learning grids with my GCSE Geography students. I’ve recently completed the grids for all topics of the course and have also updated them to include the Key Ideas from the specification so thought I would share them.

The idea behind the grids is that they outline the content of the topic to the students, students have the opportunity to reflect on their prior knowledge and understanding of the content and then have the opportunity to reflect on the development of their knowledge and understanding of the topic after completion. This enables my students to identify areas for priority when it comes to revision of the topic. I’ve done similar with the Before and After Topic Review sheets, however the format I’m sharing today is clearer and easier to construct.

I’ve constructed a general template and completed it using the specification content.

template

Students print these off at the start of the topic and complete the before column using the following key:

Red =I have no prior knowledge of this.
Amber = I have some understanding of it but need to deepen my understanding.
Green = I already have a sound understanding of this part of the topic.

Afterwards they self-assess with the following key

Red = I do not understand this aspect of the topic and need to make it my revision priority. I may need to seek help.
Amber = I have a good understanding of it but need to develop my understanding of this part of the topic.
Green = I have a confident understanding of it and could teach it to another student.

Hazards imageResources image

We complete ‘past paper questions’ throughout the topic – these are from the SAMs as well as past GCSE papers, some we have constructed ourselves. Students complete the grids as they receive feedback, setting themselves targets for how to improve exam style questions or content to revise. Students regularly have opportunities to act on feedback and demonstrate their progress.

Now the part you probably actually came to this post for… the AfL grids. Click here for them. 

Hope you can make use of them.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Guest Post from @geographyhanna – Combining Approaches

guest post

A word from MrsHumanities

I’m really excited to be sharing the very first guest post on the site. When I saw how Hanna (@geographyhanna) had combined approaches @ploguey and I to develop a feedback-feedforward approach in order to close the gap on an activity I felt it was something that should be shared more widely.

If you have something worth sharing and would like to write a guest post, get in touch.

I hope you enjoy the first guest blog on MrsHumanities.com

combining approaches

Finding myself spending hours providing specific and personalised written feedback to students, I became increasingly frustrated at the value students place on this written feedback. I often found myself writing the same thing for the same student again and again, and whilst I would provide them with DIRT time, they didn’t all use this productively or show signs of using it to improve their work and make progress. I would often get asked by Year 12 ‘so what do I have to do to improve?’, having not even read what I had thoughtfully spent time writing. It was infuriating. Searching through twitter looking for inspiration I came across @mrshumanities SpACE feedback.

I trialled the SpACE feedback initially with my dreamy top Year 7 set.  They were engaged, it got them thinking, asking amazing questions and really reflecting on their work. From this they summarised their findings into a WWW and EBI, part of our departmental policy. Reading them, they were informative and useful. Not the old classic ” you need to write more” or “work on your handwriting”, they had really thought about it. I trialled it on my Year 12’s and was equally impressed by the learning conversation and outcomes.  It has completely challenged my feedback practice and the way I view peer assessment.

Being newly addicted to twitter I had previously come across @ploguey read-edit improve approach. I had used the idea successfully with exam classes. Students really liked the level of challenge it provided and spotting mistakes became good points of conversation and developed an element of competition. The structure had the added benefit of supporting reluctant writers and highlighting the use of AfL in their books. However, I found that students were not brilliant at articulating their feedback in the ‘edit’ section and needed quite a lot of guidance for the higher level skills.

Example

This led to me combining the two ideas for my Year 11 revision session on explain the formation questions. Using the SpACE feedback provided them with some structure to their feedback and allowed them to edit and improve with a greater focus. In addition I also added an ‘apply’ section on the end, which lent itself well to the skills I was hoping to adapt. Whilst the students had not used used either approach previously and were a little saturated with revision, they engaged well and clearly showed development in their ability to structure this style of question. It is an approach I am excited about using more and will definitely be sharing and building in to schemes of learning.

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Thank you to @mrshumanities and @ploguey for the inspiration.

Hanna (@geographyhanna)

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Resource: Feedforward Book Look Record

Following my own presentation at #pedagoohampshire16 I’ve decided to try out marking crib sheets and whole class feedback in order to be able to check books more regularly but mark less since I want marking to inform planning as much as possible.

Following on from some inspiration from @MrThorntonTeach I decided to make a marking crib sheet which I’ve called the Feedforward Book Look Record.

The idea being that I will use the findings from the book looks for plan the following lessons. That way resources, activities and next steps can be catered for the class/individuals thus closing the gap sooner rather than later.

Feedforward Book Look Record DIRT Marking and Feedback

How will it be used?

Quite simply I will look through a set of books as I do I will complete the relevant sections of the record sheet.

Praise – highlight whole class and individual successes, make note of any rewards that need to be given.

Unfinished work – make note of any students with work that is incomplete in order to discuss completion with students in class.

Misconceptions – outline any misconceptions both individual and reoccurring misconceptions to late deal with during the planning of the next lesson.

SPaG – take note of any spelling mistakes that can then be incorporated into a learning activity, as well as any punctuation and grammar errors that are reoccurring so that suitable tasks or targets can be created.

Next steps – generate any questions or tasks that can be worked upon as part of the DIRT process, also highlight any particular skills I want students to work on in the work that follows.

Assessment of understanding – here I will simply place students initials where I feel their understanding of the work lies I will probably only write out those I feel are in the amber or red categories so I can focus on them in the following lesson/s.

And there you have my version of the marking crib sheet inspired by @MrThorntonTeach

You can download a copy here.

Mrs Humanities

 

 


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Need to Know Learning Matrix

learning matrixThis year grades 1-9 were  introduced into the tracking system for Key Stage 3. I struggled at first, in fact I still am, but the Need to Know Learning Matrix were my approach to tracking progress over the term for each of topics studied.

 

Not only does it allow me to track progress, outline Schemes of Work to the students and provide feedback, it encourages independent learning and reduces the time i spend marking and writing extensive feedback.

I started the year with simply listing need to know questions and success criteria but then realised that by coding the criteria I could provide quality feedback without the extensive write comments in the students books.

I simply use two different colour highlighters, fill in the key and highlight the coded success criteria. Firstly I highlight the criteria achieved in one colour, then highlight the criteria I would like the students to attempt in another; once this criteria has been achieved I simply tick it off.

matrix

I quickly l took to writing WWW and listing the criteria codes followed by the level up steps and the criteria codes I wanted the student to work on during DIRT. Sometimes I just write the criteria code with a tick to indicate it’s completion.

 

For lower ability students I may write questions to support them in achieving the coded criteria with a box to indicate the expected length of the answer.

level up2

If this has intrigued you can download my Need to Know Learning Matrix template here.

I’ve also uploaded a number of them on to TES, feel free to download and leave feedback.

Hope they’re of use.

 

Mrs Humanities