Mrs Humanities

Because I'm married to the job.


Leave a comment

Resource – DIRT Sheets

updated DIRT sheets

Recently I shared a tweet with a link to my DIRT sheets and realised the link I’d added had been for the wrong set. I then noticed how my DIRT sheets were shared in several different posts and were a challenge to find. So to clear things up a bit and to make my resources easier to access I thought I’d put them all into one post for you to access and download from.

I’ve a variety of DIRT sheets which are used during Directed Improvement and Reflection Time for students to write their improved answers.

These are the first versions I created back in 2015, these can be found in the first generation folder here .

DIRT Sheets

Then I made these which allowed students to identify their area of focus and I could identify whether they had met the target or whether there was room for improvement.
DIRT Template

This led me to create subject specific versions which are associated with levels and can be found in the second generation folder here

Finally I created some associated with grades, which can be found here.

You can access all of my DIRT sheets here. Feel free to download them and use as you will.

Hope you find them of use.

Mrs Humanities


Leave a comment

Directed Improvement and Reflection Time Sheets

A couple of years ago I started sharing my DIRT sheets – since first sharing the resources there have been over 10,000 downloads of my DIRT sheets (eck!) plus I’ve seen them used in China and South America. Since their first creation there have been 3 generations of DIRT sheets and a variety of posts link sharing.

In order to make life easier for us all, I’ve uploaded them all to a single Google drive where you can access all 3 generations of DIRT sheet; so take your pick.

1st gen

Original DIRT sheets

2nd gen

2nd Generation DIRT sheets

generations

3rd Generation DIRT sheets

You can access all of them here.

Mrs Humanities


3 Comments

Resource – Spanish Armada Double Lesson

Today I’m sharing with you one of my favourite double lessons on the Spanish Armada and its defeat.

I particularly love it for two reasons; firstly I was observed teaching part 1 by Ofsted and received a glowing report from the inspector, secondly it enables students to demonstrate their progress very easily over the two lessons.

The resources are an amalgamation of my own ideas and that of others from resources I’ve collated the past few years.

Lesson 1 – The lesson starts with an empathy exercise – putting yourself in the image – and has 3 options for students to choose how to approach the task. Students imagine they are in the image which zooms in and out, I also put sound effects on as students enter the classroom. The choice enables all students to access the task; no matter their ability or the time in which they entered the room.

starter
I’ve edited a few bits out that were relevant to the previous lesson so this resource follows on with a bit of information about the Navy Royal and some rather famous ships. It’s at this point I assess prior knowledge asking questions to obtain what students already know about the Spanish Armada (usually very little).

Next we watch a video and carry out a true or false exercise followed by self-assessment of the answers. To print off the tables off go to the end of the PowerPoint slides for a printable version.

After further discussion we move onto interpreting sources, starting with carrying out an example together.

Finally it’s on to the main task.

main task

This involves looking at sources to interpret why the Spanish were defeated. The activity has been differentiated into 3 bands of challenge for a very mixed ability group.

Spice Level 1 = designed for the lowest ability, many of these students struggled with reading and writing

Spice Level 2 = designed for the middle range most students choose to do this one

Spice Level 3 =  designed towards the most able in the year group

bronzeSilverGold

Students have the opportunity to choose the level of challenge  so they can go above but not below their target level. e.g. students working toward previous level 4 in year 8, would have been aiming to complete the bronze criteria for the topic and therefore would have been guided towards the Spice Level 1 task but could choose to do the Spice Level 2 task, whereas a student working towards level 7 would have only be allowed to do the Spice Level 3 task.

Students progress to different parts of the task sheet, dependent on the level of the task they are working on.

To finish the lesson, students select the criteria they would like assessed by their peer assessment buddy. See the criteria on the slide below. Students are encouraged to pick their weakness for peer assessment. Students then swap books and using the peer assessment pens (green) they use the marking codes or highlight relevant text. Finally they provide a kind comment and a level up target for the student to focus on next lesson.

peer assessment.png

peer assessment 2.png

Lesson 2

Students finish off the work they started the previous lesson, however this time every time the do the level up target they write in pink pen to evidence their progression.

DIRT.png
I’ve found that when students use a different colour pen to demonstrate the their progress they work a lot harder at doing it correctly e.g. if in lesson 1 a student kept spelling Armada wrong, in lesson 2 they use the pink pen when they use the word in their work. For others it has been for example using punctuation, every time they did a capital letter and full stop it would need to be in pink, this approach made them more conscientious of their work.

Finally if time students self-assess and peer-assess their work using the feedback grid I would use to mark it. They would simply tick the criteria they felt they’d achieved.

When marking the work I would then highlight in one colour the achieved criteria and highlight in a separate colour the criteria they could improve on. For some classes I set improvements as homework others have time in a DIRT lesson later in the term.

feedback

If you’d like to download the resources click here.

Hope the resources can be of use to you.

Mrs Humanities

 


2 Comments

Updated: Marking, Feedback and DIRT ideas

Marking, feedback and DIRT

After seeing a post on Friday about tip, think and challenge marking on TALK Bridgewater I was reminded of the resource I’d created with 15 ideas for Marking, Feedback and DIRT for a CPD session and was inspired to update it a bit.

So I’ve updated it with 3 new approaches and have included it here for you to download – 18 Ideas for Marking, Feedback and DIRT. A full presentation ready to go with links to the original source of any images.

Whilst I’m on the topic of marking, feedback and DIRT here are my top 5 tips

  1. Choose your assessment objectives – Remember you can’t mark everything so decide on what it is you want to assess before planning, that way then you know what it is you want to look for in your marking.
  2. Make it manageable – Yes stick to the school policy but find a way that limits how much you do outside of school and that puts onus on the students. It’s for their benefit after all. Peer and self assessment? Feedback grids? Marking stickers?
  3. Mark in class – Now I don’t mean sit at your desk and let the students get on with it, but when students are on task, read their work and have discussions with them about where they are at present and what they can do to improve what they’re working on. Feedback grids for extended pieces of work are marvelous for this, simply highlight achievements in one colour and areas to improve in another, simply tick off the improvements once complete.
  4. Make sure the students have time to respond – factor DIRT or reflection or whatever else you call it into you planning. It’s essential students have time to read, reflect and respond to all those hours of writing you’ve done. Make sure they spend longer responding to your feedback than you took giving it.
  5.  Experiment – you won’t find what works best for you and your students without experimenting a bit. I’ve done this hell of a lot of this over the past few years and have just about found what works for me and my classes. Although I will admit what works for one class doesn’t necessarily work for others; there’s certainly some mix and match going on.

Now I’m no guru when it comes to marking, feedback and DIRT but I spend a lot of time doing it, so these are just a few of my thoughts on the topic. What’s your approach to marking and feedback like?  Any other tips or ideas I should add?

Mrs Humanities


3 Comments

Updated (& new) DIRT Sheets

updated DIRT sheets

After sharing my DIRT through UKEd back in September, I had a few requests for other subjects.

Unfortunately time got the better of me and I’ve only just managed to sit down and make the additional subjects, but finally they are made.

In addition, following feedback I’ve updated the sheets to reflect the move towards grades in many school.

You can find the new and additional versions of my DIRT sheets here.

directed improvement and reflection time worksheets

Please feel free to use as you wish, feedback is always welcomed.

Any other suggestions for subjects I may have missed?

Mrs Humanities


11 Comments

Marking, feedback and DIRT

Marking, feedback and DIRTThis week I had the experience of leading a marking and DIRT workshop as part of our Teacher Conference CPD day.

For me, this was the first time I’ve led and organised a CPD session by myself.  I really enjoyed it and had lots of positive feedback so I thought I’d share the resources from my session here.

The main aims of the session were

1. To introduce the marking policy to new staff

2. To improve and support current marking and feedback

3. To make marking and feedback more efficient and quicker whilst still providing high quality feedback

Everyone received a pack of ideas which included ways of providing marking and feedback whether it be teacher assessment or self or peer assessment. With each idea came an outline of the teacher’s role, the pupil’s role and then how Directed Improvement and Reflection Time (DIRT) could be incorporated.

I won’t bore you with the details of how the workshop was then carried out and instead I’ll share with you the resources I used. Some of these ideas I’ve developed myself, others I have picked up over the last 3 years of my career.

double tick DIRTannotation marking DIRTmarking codes DIRTfeedback grid DIRTlevel up marking DIRTdot marking DIRTWWW and EBI marking and  DIRTself assessment WWW and EBI marking and DIRTRAG123generic peer assessment DIRTpeer assessment mark my weakness DIRTpeer assessment kind helpful specific DIRTPeer critique marking DIRTmatch the techerexplain the mistake marking DIRTI use the majority of these regularly in my classroom as you can see by all the photos I’ve included, others I’ve trialled but didn’t feel were completely successful or that they suited my way of teaching. However they maybe useful to others so they were included. Some I’ve still left to try, I particularly like the ‘Match the Teacher‘ technique and think I will trial this with my GCSE group in the new year.

Self and peer assessment has taken time and effort, but it really is worth the investment. Now my pupil’s have the skill and can provide each other with high quality considerate yet constructive feedback it will set them in good stead for the future. I truly recommend developing right from September in year 7.

Hope these ideas provide you with some new ideas and some suggestions on how to incorporate directed improvement and reflection time.

Please note: RAG123 example by Mrs Griffiths was originally by B Yusuf. Sorry for error in original reference.
Mrs Humanities


Leave a comment

Resource – Directed Improvement and Reflection Time Sheets

After such a great response on twitter about my DIRT sheets, I decided to add a few more to the selection that I made available here.

ICT DIRT Sheet Music DIRT sheet PE DIRT sheetWhat do you think? Suitable colours? I couldn’t decide.

Feel free to use them.

Mrs Humanities


6 Comments

Directed Improvement and Reflection Time Sheets

I’ve always felt marking to be an important yet time consuming aspect of the job. Throughout my NQT year I felt that my marking went unnoticed by the students most of the time; they just wanted to know what grade they got and didn’t take notice of the advice they were given. A  lot has changed since then and I’ve realised the power of meaningful feedback.

This year I’ve worked on engaging learners in the feedback process by developing meaningful self and peer assessment as well as incorporating Directed Improvement and Reflection Time into the planning of my schemes of work.

I feel if we spend the time marking, it might as well be beneficial and productive for the students; it should have an impact and encourage development of their work. Therefore a few months ago I set about creating some DIRT sheets, which I’ve used with my classes in a number of ways. For instance after GCSE students completed an exam question, they were given feedback and re-wrote their answer to the same question – it was quite clear when marking it the second time around that the feedback had been beneficial and they’d progress. Another way I’ve used them has been after KS3 pupils have created a piece of extended writing, pupils were given feedback and then had the choice to either improve their SPaG, to level up or to quite simply improve their answer.

Since creating my original DIRT sheets which have been used across the school, as well as my departmental DIRT display I’ve become more and more interested in marking and feedback. I was recently invited to take part in the work scrutiny which I found really insightful and have since been researching additional techniques.

Whilst I was thinking about and researching marking and feedback, I decided to make a few subject specific DIRT sheets for other staff to use.
English directed improvement and reflection time geography directed improvement and reflection time history directed improvement and reflection time maths directed improvement and reflection time science directed improvement and reflection time tech directed improvement and reflection time
French directed improvement and reflection time tech directed improvement and reflection time




Can you work out the subjects?

How to use

The idea is that once learners have read and taken on board the feedback in which they are given, they then improve or level up their work on a DIRT sheet.

I’ve found they help to make the improvements stand out in their books and for some reason they help to improve presentation, which is never a bad thing.

If you’d like to use my DIRT sheets, you can find them here. 

Feedback is always appreciated.

Mrs Humanities

DIRT


7 Comments

D.I.R.T Display

One approach to marking that my school is keen on is the provision of constructive feedback and Directed Improvement and Reflection Time (DIRT).

I’ve always marked in detail, but in my previous school a large number of students would fail to read it and act upon it; Therefore it often felt like a waste of my time spending 3-4 hours marking a set of 30-36 books a night for it not to be read.

I was pleased to find that my new school was keen to use DIRT as a means of engaging learners in their progress and demonstrating their achievements over time. Since I’m planning the Schemes of Work from scratch it means I can ensure there is time within them to carry out DIRT within lessons.

This is how it works in the Humanities Department…

Assessments take place in the 2-3 weeks before the end of term due to data submission. This usually gives us time for one DIRT session before assessments. Usually pupils respond to feedback in their books, set personal targets and consider what skills they need to focus on for the rest of the term based upon the progress displayed on their level ladders. Time well spent however it is the week after assessments when DIRT really comes into play within my department.

During this week pupils spend almost an entire lesson self-assessing, peer assessing and responding to feedback surrounding an individual piece of work from the term, whether it be the assessment they completed or classwork from a previous point. They look at how to improve work and do it.

It is becoming evident that after 2 terms of this they are now applying their skills in the rest of the Humanities lessons. Considering what they need to do to improve and how they can progress, the level ladders are no longer a sheet on the front of their books telling them what skills and knowledge they need to meet their target level this term. They are referring to them in lessons, asking what they need to do to improve their work and considering where they are on the ladder.

It’s pleasing to see, particularly with one of the hardest year 8 class. Getting them involved in DIRT has been a struggle, but we are getting there. At the end of last term we spent an entire lesson looking at peer assessing a piece of work from another group. They boxed text that met success criteria, they highlighted key words and then gave kind, specific and helpful feedback. This helped them to work out what they need to do to get out of the level 3-4 brackets and in to level 5. I hope they will apply it to their work this term.

D.I.R.T Sheets

After the previous two terms I felt that I needed something to do two things:-

Firstly I wanted pupil’s responses and improvements to be more than a line or two.
Secondly I wanted something to make the improvements pupils made to their work stand out.

…so I created and introduced these D.I.R.T sheets. 

DIRT SheetsDIRT sheet

I have to say I’ve been flabbergasted at the response from students and staff. They have made such a difference to the effort put into improving classwork during D.I.R.T during term 3.  A few misinterpreted the instructions and literally wrote what they needed to do to improve rather than doing it, but we can work on that.

Whilst after seeing my Levelling Up strategy my during a work scrutiny, my line manager asked me to share my D.I.R.T sheets and Level Up idea with staff. They’ve been very complimentary of it and I’ve even witnessed a number of teachers using it in their classrooms. It’s weird to see but great because as a school we have a consistent approach.

Levelling Up

I came up with the idea of “Levelling Up” over Christmas. Prior to that I had been writing questions in pupils books that would encourage them to work at their expected level for the current Progress Point if they weren’t doing so. I found however that pupils were not answering these questions in full sentences or to the best of their ability. So I decided to start using “Levelling Up”.

Last term in order to do this I looked at the level ladders and printed off a question or task that would help students meet their expected target grades. Based upon the work in their book I decided on an appropriate Level Up task and glued it in. Those that had one of these tasks or questions in their book had to work on it during the mid-term D.I.R.T session.

If pupils were meeting or exceeding their expected progress point grade then they had a choice of tasks such as improving their spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPaG) in a piece of work, generally just improving an answer they’ve written or they could choose a piece of criteria from their level ladder to level up further.

level up

D.I.R.T Display

I created a D.I.R.T display with two things in mind,

One – I want to show off excellent examples of the pupil’s work to demonstrate to the rest what I am looking for from self-assessment, peer-assessment and D.I.R.T.
Two – We are expecting the dreaded Ofsted any time soon, so I wanted to make it explicit to anyone that walks into the room that pupils respond and improve based upon feedback in my classroom. You know, just in case.

DIRT wall display peer assessment display

I created these pieces for display over the half term and have used them in a number of PowerPoints and resources I’ve created for next term. Once I am comfortable that the pupils understand their meanings and purpose within a lesson I’ll share them with other members of staff.

DIRTlevel upland based WWWEBI

Do you have D.I.R.T display? Would love to see it.

Hope this is of inspiration.

Mrs Humanities

plenary display board


5 Comments

The Interactive Plenary Board

Plenary BoardAfter 3 weeks of working on it here and there since the beginning of term, the Interactive Plenary Board is finally complete.

I’m really pleased with the results plus the kids are enjoying it so far.

It built up slowly, going from this…
plenary display

to this…
finished extend assess reflect - plenary display board

I now have peer assessment guidance and have identified what WWW and EBI stands for as no matter how many times we do it somebody ALWAYS has to ask what it means. I’ve also printed off smaller versions of the tickets with WWW and EBI guidance on the back to support learners in writing appropriate feedback.

So far I’ve only really been able to use it with year 8 since year 7 are currently working on their Dangerous World project; they’ve been completing Exit Tickets each lesson to demonstrate their understanding so far.

Year 8 however are engaging with the activities and particularly like the social media based ‘Assess’ activities. Not sure if that is a good or bad thing however!

Since I only see my classes twice a week so far reminding them of the new procedures when they finish the main part of the lesson has been important. Encouraging them to choose a suitable task for the time left e.g if they’ve 10 minutes to go they should choose an ‘Extend’ task; whereas if they have 5 minutes they should pick an ‘Assess’ task or roll a plenary to decide on the plenary task. The ‘Reflect’ tasks I feel need more direction, so I’ll be the one to decide when they do these, once they have practised them a number of times they should hopefully be able to recognise how long they need and choose accordingly.

Under the roll a plenary board, there is a folder with additional activities such as key word and definition match up games and top trumps. These are for pupils to practice what they are learning, most of which have been created by the kids as part of their homework and sometimes classwork.

You can find out more about where some of the resources came from here and here.

Thanks for reading.

Mrs Humanities