Mrs Humanities

Because I'm married to the job.


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Mrs Humanities shares… the 10 most viewed posts of 2018

2018 was quite an incredible year for me, it went from being offered a book deal to appearing on BBC Breakfast. In 2016, when I went through depression and a breakdown, I could barely envisage a future in teaching, to be able to use the experience to help others has been life changing for me. But I’m not here to talk about that but you can read more in my review of 2018 here.

What I am sharing in this post are the top 5 most viewed posts of 2018. They were bloomin’ popular. So here goes…

1 // Resource – GCSE Case Study and Exam Question Revision Booklet

In this post I shared a revision booklet to facilitate student independence in the revision process. Designed for AQA Geography but easily adaptable for other specifications.

The booklet provided students with a list of case studies, templates to summarise the case studies and exam questions to apply the content. With over 5,000 downloads of the booklet, I hope it’s helped students (and teachers) across the country.

2 // Resource – How to Revise in Geography

Creeping in just behind was the ‘How to Revise in Geography’ guide. Inspired by Greg Thornton’s post on How do we revise for history? which I recommended in my post on Mrs Humanities shares… 5 Epic History Revision Resources I decided to make a resource for my Geography students. It clearly hasn’t just been of benefit to my students, with almost 5,000 downloads of the document I’m hoping it’s been of help to many young people beyond my own classroom and school.

3 // Mrs Humanities shares… 10 Great Geography Revision Resources

I’m starting to see a theme now. Clearly revision has been on the minds of many this year. Perhaps it’s the pressure of accountability measures, maybe the tougher nature of the new 9-1 exams or maybe teachers just want to improve their student’s approach to revision, either way most popular post number 3 was another revision one. This time I shared and highlighted the work of a range of Geography teachers from the Twittersphere including
@teachgeogblog , @Jennnnnn_x , @InternetGeog , @GeoNewbz  and other. Many of these I have made use of in my own classroom.

4 // Zombie Apocalypse Atlas and Map Skills SoW

This one is always a popular post. In it I have shared resources to the scheme of work I produced to develop and embed atlas and map skills through the scenario of a zombie apocalypse. I’ve taught it a couple of times and every time it has been loved by the students.

I’ve seen it (via twitter and emails) used in classrooms across the world, which is incredible. It’s been adapted into other languages (Welsh and Chinese) and has been download over 40,000 times since I first published it back in Autumn 2015.

5 // Resource – Differentiation Strategies CPD

Next up was a resource I produced to support teacher training on differentiation. The presentation provides a variety of tried and tested strategies for differentiation and scaffolding to support and challenge students. You can even download the ready-to-go PowerPoint presentation.

6 // Mrs Humanities shares… 5 Whole Class Feedback Examples

Unsurprisingly the next few most read posts of 2018 are associated with feedback and marking. In this one, I shared 5 examples of whole class feedback to support teachers, departments and schools making the move from marking to feedback.

7 // My Marking and Feedback Toolkit

Since publishing this post in January 2017, it’s been a popular one. In this post I share the strategies that make up my marking and feedback toolkit. I tried and tested a range of strategies over a couple of years to find what worked best for me, my style of teaching and most importantly my students. In that time I changed schools and had to start again with the narrowing down process but it didn’t take me long to find what worked. This post goes on to highlight those 5 strategies.

8 // Mrs Humanities shares… 6 Epic History Revision Resources

Back to revision again, this one shared 6 epic resources for revision in History. I no longer teach history but I do like to keep up with pedagogical developments and resource sharing just in case I ever return to it. This post needs up-dating as I’ve seen many more fantastic resources since I first posted it, that will happen in due course I promise.*

*but please don’t hold me accountable if I do completely forget 🙂

9 // Marking, feedback and DIRT

This is one of my first posts on marking and feedback from way back in June 2015. The area of interest has come along way since then, but it’s a great post for those new to the profession or those being introduced to the idea of #feedbackNOTmarking.

In the post I share a range of strategies I’d tried in order to improve feedback but reduce workload. These then made up part of a CPD session for new and current staff at the school I was working at. The post also provides a downloadable resource with all the strategies included.

10 // Mrs Humanities shares… 10 fantastic displays for the Humanities

The final most popular post of the 10 was this one where I shared 10 fantastic display ideas for Humanities. The post shared 10 great examples of displays I’d come across on Twitter from the likes of @mrsrgeog @sehartsmith @MrJPteach  @EduCaiti and several more.

And that sums up this post on the 10 most popular posts of 2018. Hope you’ve found something of use and inspiration this year. Thank you for the continued support throughout 2018.

Best wishes for 2019.


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Mrs Humanities shares… Simulation Games for Geography

I was recently searching for GIS resources when I came across an old document I had about the use of simulation games in Geography. I haven’t used them for a long while (since my PGCE) so thought I’d take a look at what is out there now and share some useful ones with you. 

Disaster Master

Suitable for Key Stage 2 and 3.

Each disaster starts with a comic strip style introduction before a question is asked and a decision is to be made. Depending on the option chosen, students earn points. 

The game takes students through a range of scenarios and solutions, giving them insight into the hazard and management. 

Stop Disasters

Suitable for Key Stage 3 and 4.

This game is provided by the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction. Through a range of scenarios and levels students develop an understanding of the risks posed by natural hazards.

Students can choose between tsunamis, hurricanes, wildfires, earthquakes and floods. 

Once a hazard has been selected players can choose a scenario from numerous regions of the world allowing students to compare countries of different stages of development. 

The game then takes the player through a scenario in which they have to respond through careful planning and preparation. With limited funds students have to consider how to spend the money effectively. 

2050 Energy Calculator

Suitable for Key Stage 4 and 5.

This is an interactive game created by the Department for Energy and Climate Change that allows students to explore scenarios to reduce the UK’s carbon emissions. 

Students explore supply and demand as well as energy security, air quality and costs in this simulation. It provides effective insight into future energy challenges. 

FloodSim

Suitable for Key Stage 3 and 4.

This simulation aims to raise awareness of the issues surrounding flood policy and management. During the game students are put in control of flood policy in the UK for three years. They must decide on how much money to spend on defenses, where to build houses and how to keep the public informed all whilst remaining in budget. 

They are required to weigh up the pros and cons of flood management against the potential impacts. 

Climate Bathtub Simulation 

Suitable for Key Stage 3, 4 and 5.

A very simple interactive simulation game, the climate bathtub simulation teaches several principles regarding the dynamics of the global carbon cycle and climate change. It helps students to understand how changes in carbon dioxide emissions will affect levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Energy Saving Game

Suitable for Key Stage 2

In this game students explore the home for potential energy efficiency improvements and answer quiz questions to lower a house’s energy use.

Other games I’ve not tried

Fate of the World  – Climate Change Simulation

ElectroCity – Urban Management Game

Eco – Decision making game 

EarthGames


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Resource – Lagos Redevelopment DME

resourceA simple activity that stimulates students abilities to make informed decisions in preparation for AQA Paper 3. Students are given resources on the redevelopment of the waterfront of Lagos in order to make a decision on whether the waterfront redevelopment should take place. After discussion students answer the exam style question.

tasksources

There are a wide range of videos that could be shown to the class alongside the resources to develop their understanding of the redevelopment.

Some suggestions include

EKO ATLANTIC Lagos Nigeria. Whats Inside??

Residents of Nigeria’s floating slum thrive

Lagos: Evicted slum-dwellers demand right to return

Download the resources by clicking below.

download here

 

Mrs Humanities


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Resource – Assessment for Learning Booklet AQA Geography

resourceI’ve previously shared with you all the AfL grids my department and I use with our GCSE students which our students use to assess their understanding of the content before and after the topic. They also enable students to track their progress.

We make use of ‘PPQs’ also known as past paper questions. These are mostly taken from the AQA sample papers but we have also used a number of relevant questions from past papers.

Rather than printing off each set of PPQs as and when required, this year to help our students to become more independent in the learning process I’ve created an assessment for learning booklet.

These booklets contain both the AfL grids and the PPQs which will be completed over the course. Some times PPQs are completed in class, other times for homework.

booklet pages

My plan is that as we cover the content, students can start to answer the PPQs when they are ready to do so. A deadline for submitting the PPQs will be set as we undertake the topic so students have a deadline to work to.

You can download a copy of it by clicking the button below.

download here

Feedback welcomed.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Resource – IBDP Geography Case Study Revision Booklets

resourceAfter the success of the GCSE case study and exam question booklets, I’ve set out making similar resources for my IB students. So far the booklet/s consist of case study template sheets. As more sample papers and exam papers become available I will start adding exam questions to the booklets.

The booklets start by outlining the case studies and examples required by the IB specification.

page 1

And they are then followed by a series of case study template sheets for students to complete as part of the review and revise process.

page 5

page 12

Eventually exam questions will be added for students to apply their knowledge to.

For a copy of the booklets, click the relevant link below.

Paper 1 Option B – Oceans and Coastal Margins
Paper 2 – Unit 1: Changing Population
Paper 2 – Unit 2: Global Climate

In Progress – Whole Course Case Study and Exam Question Booklet

As I complete the others they will be added.

Mrs Humanities


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Resource – Paper 3 Question, Mark Scheme and Answer Advice Match UP

resourceRecently I put together an activity that involved my students looking at AQA paper 3 fieldwork questions, their mark schemes and answer advice. The feedback from the students was resoundingly positive and after some recent requests I thought I’d share it.

The card consisted of 6 questions, 6 mark schemes and 6 answer advice cards.

instructions

cards to cut out.png

cards.jpg

Students were given the set of 6 questions from Paper 3, Section B on fieldwork and were asked to try and work out how many marks the question would be worth. Students were thinking about the command terms and the content of the question, their discussions effective at drawing out the purpose of the question.

Next they tried to match the mark schemes to the question.

cards-2.jpg

Finally they added the answer advice cards.

cards-4.jpg

We then went through the questions, the marks available and discussed how to answer them before finally answering the questions for themselves.

 

To download an editable copy click here below

download here

 

Hope you can find it of use.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Resource – How to Revise in Geography

how to revise

Inspired by Greg Thornton’s post on How do we revise for history? which I recommended in my post on Mrs Humanities shares… 5 Epic History Revision Resources I decided to make a resource for my Geography students.

I’ve taken a slightly different approach, giving a range of approaches to revision but thought it might be useful for others as well.

At the bottom of the page you can download a version for GCSE and IB Geography.

how to revise in geography

how to revise geography

page 3

page 4

page 5

Each idea or method has a link or two offered with it that will allow students to access apps or resources to support them.

To download a PDF version for GCSE click the image below.

download here

To download a PDF version for IB Geography click the image below

I’ve also added a generic editable version on TES here – https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/how-to-revise-in-insert-subject-guidance-sheet-11852796

Hope you find and your students find it of use.

Mrs Humanities


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Resource – Describing routes using maps

resourceThis resource is one I created during my PGCE back in 2010-11 and I think I’ve used it with year 7 every year since. It’s one of those resources that is always applicable.

It’s quite a simple activity. Students are given a map, key and task sheet.

 

The task sheet provides a cops and robbers scenario with descriptions being provided by a helicopter overhead. Students have to follow the suspects around the map and fill in the missing information or select the appropriate information from the options provided in order to catch the suspects. The task sheet has been provided as a word document so you can easily amend to suit your students.

To grab a copy of this resource click here. 

download here

Hope you find the resource of use.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Mrs Humanities shares… Subject Specific Teacher Facebook Groups

mrs humanities shares

It was pointed out to me after sharing my last Mrs Humanities shares… post on History Revision Resources that many people share their resources via Facebook groups now instead of other online platforms yet I still speak to people who are completely unaware of this.

In order to inform those that might be interested I’ve collated the variety of Facebook teaching groups in this post to help you find them easily. I imagine this is not an exhaustive list so if you know of others please let me know.

geography

General Geography

// National Geography Department

// UK Geography teachers resource sharing

// Geographypods.com

Geography GCSE

// AQA GCSE Geography Teachers Group

// Edexcel Geography B (9-1) Community

// Edexcel GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// Eduqas geography spec B

// OCR A GCSE Geography

// OCR B GCSE Geography Teachers’ Group

// WJEC and WJEC Eduqas GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// WJEC Geography Teachers

// Edexcel iGCSE Geography

Geography A-Level and IB

// AQA A Level Geography Teachers Group

// OCR Geography AS/A Level Teachers

// Edexcel A Level Geography Teachers Group

// IB DP Geography Teachers Support Group

history

General History

// History Teachers and Those Interested in History Education UK

History GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE History 2016 support group

// Edexcel GCSE History

// New AQA GCSE History 2016

// WJEC/Eduqas GCSE History

// OCR GCSE History A 9-11 support group

// IGCSE History Teachers: Support Group

History A-Level and IB

// Teachers of AQA A level History

// OCR A-Level History support group

// Edexcel A Level History support group

// IBDP History Teachers: Support Group

RS.png

General Religious Studies

// Save RE – The Subject Community for RE Professionals

// RE Teachers Forum

Religious Studies GCSE

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Christianity & Islam (Teachers only)

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Teachers & Resources

// Edexcel Religious Studies GCSE

// GCSE Hinduism – Religious Studies – RE/RS Teachers Group

// OCR Gcse Religious Studies First Teach 2016

Religious Studies A-Level

// AQA A-Level Religious Studies 2016

// Edexcel Religious Studies A Level (For Teachers Only)

// Eduqas A-Level Religious Studies Teachers

// OCR A Level Religious Studies H173 and H573 for professionals

// KS5 Buddhism Teachers (AS/A2 Religious Studies)

citizenship

General Citizenship

// Teachers of Secondary PSHE & Citizenship

Citizenship GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE Citizenship Studies

other.png

// PSHE, Collective Worship, RE & Citizenship teacher forum

// PSHE & Careers Teachers Centre

// MYP Individuals and Societies: Teachers’ Support Group

I hope this helps you to connect, share and inspire.

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities reviews… ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’.

Mrs Humanities reviews...

In November 2017, I met Mark Harris at a Teach Meet. Since then, I’ve read his book ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’. It’s been an interesting read; much of which I agree with so it’s nice to hear others saying the same thing.

book cover.png

The book starts by exploring the concept of outstanding teaching before discussing planning for progress and lesson design.

As I read the first 3 chapters I found myself highlighting multiple parts to share with my department, to reflect upon or to note for future reference. A lot of the theory I agreed with. In particular I liked the fact that this book recognises that outstanding teachers aren’t outstanding all the time or at everything.

“It’s important to realise that not every lesson you teach will be outstanding, and there is nothing wrong with this.” Mark Harris

Chapter 2 I found of most interest; this chapter explored designing and developing a sequence of lessons. The key focus here is that we should begin with the end in mind to enable us to have a clear vision of the skills and knowledge our students must acquire to be successful. This chapter encourages the reader to reflect on the geographical skills, knowledge and understanding that set the foundations for our subject, courses and curriculum and to consider how assessment can take place.

planning for progress

Figure 2.2 above from page 9 of ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’ summarised effectively the process in which I went through in planning a Humanities curriculum a few years ago. If you are currently renewing or planning a geography curriculum this chapter is really useful.

Chapter 3 then explores lesson planning through a series of stages and highlights the importance of planning for learning rather than how you plan to teach. A key point I never really learnt until my third year of teaching as I designed a new curriculum from scratch. It’s important to learn this early on to maximise the impact of your teaching. New teachers will find this chapter invaluable; improving teachers will find it useful yet the more effective practitioners may find it of little use.

From chapter 4 to chapter 13, I felt this book came into its own with its wide variety of ideas and strategies to develop one’s practice. These chapters look at a variety of good practice associated with questioning, differentiation, geographical enquiry, literacy and numeracy. Later followed by strategies for teaching A level, marking for progress and homework.

Some of my favourites included…

  • the chapter on ‘Marking for Progress’ (No surprise!) and the idea of the progress wheel which pretty much a simplified version of my before and after topic reflection sheets.
  • the introduction to flipped learning and the ‘Flipped Learning sheet’ which could easily be created and adapted to one’s desired uses.
  • the chapter on ‘How to create curiosity and teach geography through enquiry’ which takes the reader through the process of creating an enquiry.

Whilst I felt a lot of it I already applied to my practice. Overall there’s plenty to influence the practice of the newbie teacher or the improving teacher; there’s a lot to be learnt from the book and plenty to inspire.

It’s a book I’ll encourage my department to read.

To grab your own copy click here.

If you’ve read it, share your thoughts.

Mrs Humanities