Mrs Humanities

Because I'm married to the job

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Resource – Paper 3 Question, Mark Scheme and Answer Advice Match UP

Recently I put together an activity that involved my students looking at AQA paper 3 fieldwork questions, their mark schemes and answer advice. The feedback from the students was resoundingly positive and after some recent requests I thought I’d share it.

The card consisted of 6 questions, 6 mark schemes and 6 answer advice cards.


cards to cut out.png


Students were given the set of 6 questions from Paper 3, Section B on fieldwork and were asked to try and work out how many marks the question would be worth. Students were thinking about the command terms and the content of the question, their discussions effective at drawing out the purpose of the question.

Next they tried to match the mark schemes to the question.


Finally they added the answer advice cards.


We then went through the questions, the marks available and discussed how to answer them before finally answering the questions for themselves.


To download an editable copy click here below

download here


Hope you can find it of use.

Mrs Humanities



Resource – How to Revise in Geography

how to revise

Inspired by Greg Thornton’s post on How do we revise for history? which I recommended in my post on Mrs Humanities shares… 5 Epic History Revision Resources I decided to make a resource for my Geography students.

I’ve taken a slightly different approach, giving a range of approaches to revision but thought it might be useful for others as well.

At the bottom of the page you can download a version for GCSE and IB Geography.

how to revise in geography

how to revise geography

page 3

page 4

page 5

Each idea or method has a link or two offered with it that will allow students to access apps or resources to support them.

To download a PDF version for GCSE click the image below.

download here

To download a PDF version for IB Geography click the image below

I’ve also added a generic editable version on TES here –

Hope you find and your students find it of use.

Mrs Humanities

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Resource – Describing routes using maps

This resource is one I created during my PGCE back in 2010-11 and I think I’ve used it with year 7 every year since. It’s one of those resources that is always applicable.

It’s quite a simple activity. Students are given a map, key and task sheet.

The task sheet provides a cops and robbers scenario with descriptions being provided by a helicopter overhead. Students have to follow the suspects around the map and fill in the missing information or select the appropriate information from the options provided in order to catch the suspects. The task sheet has been provided as a word document so you can easily amend to suit your students.

To grab a copy of this resource click here. 

download here

Hope you find the resource of use.

Mrs Humanities



Mrs Humanities shares… Subject Specific Teacher Facebook Groups

mrs humanities shares

It was pointed out to me after sharing my last Mrs Humanities shares… post on History Revision Resources that many people share their resources via Facebook groups now instead of other online platforms yet I still speak to people who are completely unaware of this.

In order to inform those that might be interested I’ve collated the variety of Facebook teaching groups in this post to help you find them easily. I imagine this is not an exhaustive list so if you know of others please let me know.


General Geography

// National Geography Department

// UK Geography teachers resource sharing


Geography GCSE

// AQA GCSE Geography Teachers Group

// Edexcel Geography B (9-1) Community

// Edexcel GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// Eduqas geography spec B

// OCR A GCSE Geography

// OCR B GCSE Geography Teachers’ Group

// WJEC and WJEC Eduqas GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// WJEC Geography Teachers

// Edexcel iGCSE Geography

Geography A-Level and IB

// AQA A Level Geography Teachers Group

// OCR Geography AS/A Level Teachers

// Edexcel A Level Geography Teachers Group

// IB DP Geography Teachers Support Group


General History

// History Teachers and Those Interested in History Education UK

History GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE History 2016 support group

// Edexcel GCSE History

// New AQA GCSE History 2016

// WJEC/Eduqas GCSE History

// OCR GCSE History A 9-11 support group

// IGCSE History Teachers: Support Group

History A-Level and IB

// Teachers of AQA A level History

// OCR A-Level History support group

// Edexcel A Level History support group

// IBDP History Teachers: Support Group


General Religious Studies

// Save RE – The Subject Community for RE Professionals

// RE Teachers Forum

Religious Studies GCSE

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Christianity & Islam (Teachers only)

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Teachers & Resources

// Edexcel Religious Studies GCSE

// GCSE Hinduism – Religious Studies – RE/RS Teachers Group

// OCR Gcse Religious Studies First Teach 2016

Religious Studies A-Level

// AQA A-Level Religious Studies 2016

// Edexcel Religious Studies A Level (For Teachers Only)

// Eduqas A-Level Religious Studies Teachers

// OCR A Level Religious Studies H173 and H573 for professionals

// KS5 Buddhism Teachers (AS/A2 Religious Studies)


General Citizenship

// Teachers of Secondary PSHE & Citizenship

Citizenship GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE Citizenship Studies


// PSHE, Collective Worship, RE & Citizenship teacher forum

// PSHE & Careers Teachers Centre

// MYP Individuals and Societies: Teachers’ Support Group

I hope this helps you to connect, share and inspire.

Mrs Humanities

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Mrs Humanities reviews… ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’.

Mrs Humanities reviews...

In November 2017, I met Mark Harris at a Teach Meet. Since then, I’ve read his book ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’. It’s been an interesting read; much of which I agree with so it’s nice to hear others saying the same thing.

book cover.png

The book starts by exploring the concept of outstanding teaching before discussing planning for progress and lesson design.

As I read the first 3 chapters I found myself highlighting multiple parts to share with my department, to reflect upon or to note for future reference. A lot of the theory I agreed with. In particular I liked the fact that this book recognises that outstanding teachers aren’t outstanding all the time or at everything.

“It’s important to realise that not every lesson you teach will be outstanding, and there is nothing wrong with this.” Mark Harris

Chapter 2 I found of most interest; this chapter explored designing and developing a sequence of lessons. The key focus here is that we should begin with the end in mind to enable us to have a clear vision of the skills and knowledge our students must acquire to be successful. This chapter encourages the reader to reflect on the geographical skills, knowledge and understanding that set the foundations for our subject, courses and curriculum and to consider how assessment can take place.

planning for progress

Figure 2.2 above from page 9 of ‘Becoming an Outstanding Geography Teacher’ summarised effectively the process in which I went through in planning a Humanities curriculum a few years ago. If you are currently renewing or planning a geography curriculum this chapter is really useful.

Chapter 3 then explores lesson planning through a series of stages and highlights the importance of planning for learning rather than how you plan to teach. A key point I never really learnt until my third year of teaching as I designed a new curriculum from scratch. It’s important to learn this early on to maximise the impact of your teaching. New teachers will find this chapter invaluable; improving teachers will find it useful yet the more effective practitioners may find it of little use.

From chapter 4 to chapter 13, I felt this book came into its own with its wide variety of ideas and strategies to develop one’s practice. These chapters look at a variety of good practice associated with questioning, differentiation, geographical enquiry, literacy and numeracy. Later followed by strategies for teaching A level, marking for progress and homework.

Some of my favourites included…

  • the chapter on ‘Marking for Progress’ (No surprise!) and the idea of the progress wheel which pretty much a simplified version of my before and after topic reflection sheets.
  • the introduction to flipped learning and the ‘Flipped Learning sheet’ which could easily be created and adapted to one’s desired uses.
  • the chapter on ‘How to create curiosity and teach geography through enquiry’ which takes the reader through the process of creating an enquiry.

Whilst I felt a lot of it I already applied to my practice. Overall there’s plenty to influence the practice of the newbie teacher or the improving teacher; there’s a lot to be learnt from the book and plenty to inspire.

It’s a book I’ll encourage my department to read.

To grab your own copy click here.

If you’ve read it, share your thoughts.

Mrs Humanities