Mrs Humanities

Because I'm married to the job.


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Resource – Thematic unit on conflict, fortification and armour

When I taught Geography and History through the umbrella of Humanities, we did a lot of thematic topics; exploring concepts over time and space.

I thought I’d share with you the unit we did on conflict, fortification and armour.

Outline

The unit took students through technological advances in conflict, fortification and armour, finishing with a personal interest project.

I remember my year 8’s really enjoying the topic. It gave them insight to different time periods and encouraged them to research and find out more.

Here are some example resources:

The topic covers a range of content and whilst I’ve produced much of it, some elements such as the ‘top trumps’ were free resources available online. Since it was so long ago since I made the lessons (2015) I can’t remember the original sources but if you find one of them is yours please let me know and I will add your name and the source to the piece.

Castles – Type and Location

Siege Warfare

War at Sea

World War 1 – Technological Change


Homework

Homework gave students choice and different levels of challenge.

Week 1 Homework
Week 3 – 7 Homework

Examples of the homework produced




Levels
You will notice some of the resources use National Curriculum Levels and some use GCSE ‘grades’, I’ve just uploaded the resources I had. I clearly hadn’t backed up all of the resources at home before leaving the school. Doh!

If you’d like to access the resources you can do so here.

I’m not a historian, so my apologies if there are any historical inaccuracies, I put a lot of research into the materials and got them checked by my historian husband…. but I’m sure there will be something to be found.

Hope you can find them of use.

U


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Mrs Humanities shares… the 10 most viewed posts of 2018

2018 was quite an incredible year for me, it went from being offered a book deal to appearing on BBC Breakfast. In 2016, when I went through depression and a breakdown, I could barely envisage a future in teaching, to be able to use the experience to help others has been life changing for me. But I’m not here to talk about that but you can read more in my review of 2018 here.

What I am sharing in this post are the top 5 most viewed posts of 2018. They were bloomin’ popular. So here goes…

1 // Resource – GCSE Case Study and Exam Question Revision Booklet

In this post I shared a revision booklet to facilitate student independence in the revision process. Designed for AQA Geography but easily adaptable for other specifications.

The booklet provided students with a list of case studies, templates to summarise the case studies and exam questions to apply the content. With over 5,000 downloads of the booklet, I hope it’s helped students (and teachers) across the country.

2 // Resource – How to Revise in Geography

Creeping in just behind was the ‘How to Revise in Geography’ guide. Inspired by Greg Thornton’s post on How do we revise for history? which I recommended in my post on Mrs Humanities shares… 5 Epic History Revision Resources I decided to make a resource for my Geography students. It clearly hasn’t just been of benefit to my students, with almost 5,000 downloads of the document I’m hoping it’s been of help to many young people beyond my own classroom and school.

3 // Mrs Humanities shares… 10 Great Geography Revision Resources

I’m starting to see a theme now. Clearly revision has been on the minds of many this year. Perhaps it’s the pressure of accountability measures, maybe the tougher nature of the new 9-1 exams or maybe teachers just want to improve their student’s approach to revision, either way most popular post number 3 was another revision one. This time I shared and highlighted the work of a range of Geography teachers from the Twittersphere including
@teachgeogblog , @Jennnnnn_x , @InternetGeog , @GeoNewbz  and other. Many of these I have made use of in my own classroom.

4 // Zombie Apocalypse Atlas and Map Skills SoW

This one is always a popular post. In it I have shared resources to the scheme of work I produced to develop and embed atlas and map skills through the scenario of a zombie apocalypse. I’ve taught it a couple of times and every time it has been loved by the students.

I’ve seen it (via twitter and emails) used in classrooms across the world, which is incredible. It’s been adapted into other languages (Welsh and Chinese) and has been download over 40,000 times since I first published it back in Autumn 2015.

5 // Resource – Differentiation Strategies CPD

Next up was a resource I produced to support teacher training on differentiation. The presentation provides a variety of tried and tested strategies for differentiation and scaffolding to support and challenge students. You can even download the ready-to-go PowerPoint presentation.

6 // Mrs Humanities shares… 5 Whole Class Feedback Examples

Unsurprisingly the next few most read posts of 2018 are associated with feedback and marking. In this one, I shared 5 examples of whole class feedback to support teachers, departments and schools making the move from marking to feedback.

7 // My Marking and Feedback Toolkit

Since publishing this post in January 2017, it’s been a popular one. In this post I share the strategies that make up my marking and feedback toolkit. I tried and tested a range of strategies over a couple of years to find what worked best for me, my style of teaching and most importantly my students. In that time I changed schools and had to start again with the narrowing down process but it didn’t take me long to find what worked. This post goes on to highlight those 5 strategies.

8 // Mrs Humanities shares… 6 Epic History Revision Resources

Back to revision again, this one shared 6 epic resources for revision in History. I no longer teach history but I do like to keep up with pedagogical developments and resource sharing just in case I ever return to it. This post needs up-dating as I’ve seen many more fantastic resources since I first posted it, that will happen in due course I promise.*

*but please don’t hold me accountable if I do completely forget 🙂

9 // Marking, feedback and DIRT

This is one of my first posts on marking and feedback from way back in June 2015. The area of interest has come along way since then, but it’s a great post for those new to the profession or those being introduced to the idea of #feedbackNOTmarking.

In the post I share a range of strategies I’d tried in order to improve feedback but reduce workload. These then made up part of a CPD session for new and current staff at the school I was working at. The post also provides a downloadable resource with all the strategies included.

10 // Mrs Humanities shares… 10 fantastic displays for the Humanities

The final most popular post of the 10 was this one where I shared 10 fantastic display ideas for Humanities. The post shared 10 great examples of displays I’d come across on Twitter from the likes of @mrsrgeog @sehartsmith @MrJPteach  @EduCaiti and several more.

And that sums up this post on the 10 most popular posts of 2018. Hope you’ve found something of use and inspiration this year. Thank you for the continued support throughout 2018.

Best wishes for 2019.


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Resource – Why did Parliament turn on Charles I?

origins

As part of the themetic topic on Law and Order I developed at my last school, we explored the origins of Parliament. After having looking at the origins the students explored why and how Parliament turned on Charles I.

The students spent a couple of lessons on the topic in order to uncover the cause, consequence and significance of Charles’s execution in 1649.

They started with a card sort, which they used to develop an interpretation of events.

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Students read, sorted and linked the cards by writing on the tables with whiteboard pens to create their interpretations.

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This was then followed up with a piece of extended writing which involved them using the card sort, our discussions and their annotations to write 3 paragraphs on the cause, consequence and significance of Charles’s execution.

You can download the resources here, along with some resources for LA students.

download here

Hope you can make use of the resources.

Mrs Humanities

 

 


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Resource – Origins of Parliament Assessed Task

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When I set up the Humanities department at my last school, I decided to that students would study thematic topics; One of those was Law and Order.

Students in year 9 explored the origins of government and parliament from 1066.

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As part of the topic on Law and Order students explored a variety of historical events that led to the development of parliament and government here in the UK as well as the consequences. This was later followed by looking at law and crime in Victorian Britain.

foragainstroyaltablegoodbadPart way through the topic students had a simple recall test and an assessed extended writing task.

 

 

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The assessed extended writing task I favoured. Students got to explore their understanding of the topic content drawing upon their understanding of cause, consequence and significance.

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The feedback sheet looked like this, to feedback I used one colour highlighter to identify successes and another for next steps to work on during feedforward time.

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This was then followed by the English Civil war and a mystery inquiry on why did Parliament turn against the King? We finished the topic with a look at modern day.

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Students came away with a thorough understanding of how and why parliament and governance has developed.

To access the assessed task shown above click here. 

download here

If you’d like the resources as well for the topic, get in touch. I’ve magpied a variety of resources from a range of free sources such as the UK governments education pages so don’t want to publicly share them.

Hope you find the ideas of some use.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Resource – 1066 and all that

1066

I’ve just been going through some of my resources I realised I’ve a lot of history resources I’m unlikely to use any time soon but I don’t want them to just there on my computer.

This scheme of work starts by looking at key events between 410 AD and 1066 before going on to explore life in Anglo-Saxon Britain. The topic then goes on to look at the contenders for the throne, the Battle of Stamford Bridge and on to the Battle of Hastings. Finishing with the Harrying of the North after an assessment.

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Each lesson has a range of resources suited for mixed ability and ability set classes. When I taught these lessons I was teaching in a school with a wide range of abilities from students that could barely read and write to students that had moved out of grammar schools. Classes were in ability sets and the work created to suit their varying needs and abilities.

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There are a wide range of activities from timelines to historical detectives; campaigns to extended writing tasks.  As well as a wide selection of support material.

 

The lessons use a range of resources that I have both created from scratch and adapted from freely available resources over the years. I can’t credit any work I’ve magpied since I don’t know the sources after having used and amended them over two years ago. If you see anything that belongs to you please don’t hesitate to let me know and I will either acknowledge you or remove it.

To access the resources click here.

download here

Hope they can be of some use as springboard for lesson planning.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Mrs Humanities shares… Subject Specific Teacher Facebook Groups

mrs humanities shares

It was pointed out to me after sharing my last Mrs Humanities shares… post on History Revision Resources that many people share their resources via Facebook groups now instead of other online platforms yet I still speak to people who are completely unaware of this.

In order to inform those that might be interested I’ve collated the variety of Facebook teaching groups in this post to help you find them easily. I imagine this is not an exhaustive list so if you know of others please let me know.

geography

General Geography

// National Geography Department

// UK Geography teachers resource sharing

// Geographypods.com

Geography GCSE

// AQA GCSE Geography Teachers Group

// Edexcel Geography B (9-1) Community

// Edexcel GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// Eduqas geography spec B

// OCR A GCSE Geography

// OCR B GCSE Geography Teachers’ Group

// WJEC and WJEC Eduqas GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// WJEC Geography Teachers

// Edexcel iGCSE Geography

Geography A-Level and IB

// AQA A Level Geography Teachers Group

// OCR Geography AS/A Level Teachers

// Edexcel A Level Geography Teachers Group

// IB DP Geography Teachers Support Group

history

General History

// History Teachers and Those Interested in History Education UK

History GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE History 2016 support group

// Edexcel GCSE History

// New AQA GCSE History 2016

// WJEC/Eduqas GCSE History

// OCR GCSE History A 9-11 support group

// IGCSE History Teachers: Support Group

History A-Level and IB

// Teachers of AQA A level History

// OCR A-Level History support group

// Edexcel A Level History support group

// IBDP History Teachers: Support Group

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General Religious Studies

// Save RE – The Subject Community for RE Professionals

// RE Teachers Forum

Religious Studies GCSE

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Christianity & Islam (Teachers only)

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Teachers & Resources

// Edexcel Religious Studies GCSE

// GCSE Hinduism – Religious Studies – RE/RS Teachers Group

// OCR Gcse Religious Studies First Teach 2016

Religious Studies A-Level

// AQA A-Level Religious Studies 2016

// Edexcel Religious Studies A Level (For Teachers Only)

// Eduqas A-Level Religious Studies Teachers

// OCR A Level Religious Studies H173 and H573 for professionals

// KS5 Buddhism Teachers (AS/A2 Religious Studies)

citizenship

General Citizenship

// Teachers of Secondary PSHE & Citizenship

Citizenship GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE Citizenship Studies

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// PSHE, Collective Worship, RE & Citizenship teacher forum

// PSHE & Careers Teachers Centre

// MYP Individuals and Societies: Teachers’ Support Group

I hope this helps you to connect, share and inspire.

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities shares… 6 Epic History Revision Resources

mrs humanities shares

Following last week’s Mrs Humanities shares… post on geography revision resources I thought I’d collate some of the epic free resources being shared for history. Whilst I may no longer teach history I still like to keep in touch with subject content, good practice and pedagogical developments in the subject. Unfortunately there’s not so much in the way of free revision resources that I could find, so many of these are revision sites with useful material.

So here goes, in no particular order…

1 //  How do we revise for history? from @MrThorntonTeach

This resource is fantastic. Greg has created a history specific help sheet that offers ways to revise within the context of History. The sheet outlines methods with clear ‘how to use in history’ sections, linking to the knowledge and skills GCSE students need.

Download here https://mrthorntonteach.com/2018/02/04/how-do-we-revise-for-history/

2 // Retrieval Practice Grids from @87History

A simple but effective revision strategy that can be used as starter or plenary or even as an activity during revision sessions. Quite simple to construct simply set up the structure and add a range questions that require students to retrieve and recall information from last lesson, last week and even further. A useful revision strategy to recap and revisit subject content.

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More info here http://lovetoteach87.com/2018/01/12/retrieval-practice-challenge-grids-for-the-classroom/

3 // MrAllsopHistory.com from @MrAllsopHistory 

This site is an incredible revision resource for students and teachers alike. When I first started teaching GCSE History, this was one of my go-to sites. So much content for such a wide range of topics across GCSE, A-Level and IB.

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Access here https://www.mrallsophistory.com/revision/

4 // RogersHistory Online Revision Courses from @RogersHistory 

Now I will admit I’ve not accessed the courses myself but I know Tom is a great educator and I have undertaken 2 of his Teacher CPD courses. I imagine the student revision courses are of the same high quality.

 

Access here http://www.rogershistory.com/online-revision-courses

5 // FlippingHistory.net from @FlippingHistory

Flipping History is a set of history lessons from Mr Guiney that can support students with their revision and teachers with their planning. Wide variety of content.

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Access here https://www.flippinghistory.net/

6 // History 5 a day from @sehartsmith

I originally saw these as a tweet from @sehartsmith  and thought they needed to be shared so contacted her to see if she would be willing to share them. Luckily for you lot, Sarah has been generous and popped them into a google drive you to access and download. Just click here.

 

I would love to add more resources, but after an extensive search for FREE revision resources I couldn’t find much so if you can point me in the right direction PLEASE do.

Remember resource sharing = reduced workloads.

Best wishes,

Mrs Humanities

 


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Mrs Humanities shares… 10 History Teachers to follow on Twitter.

mrs humanities shares

This is the second in my new series of posts – Mrs Humanities shares… In each post from the series I will be sharing some of the stand out practice I’m regularly inspired by, interesting ideas, recently shared resources, news stories etc. If there’s something in particular you’d like to see then suggestions are warmly welcomed.

This time I’m really excited to be sharing some fantastic practitioners that I’ve had the pleasure of meeting in person on several occasions and love sharing ideas with. Others I’m yet to meet but find them a source of inspiration regularly. In no particular order then…

Tom Rogers

Tom Rogers
Head of History and owner of  RogersHistory.com
This man is the mind behind #TMHistoryIcons, a quality source of inspiration for both the historian and general teacher alike. Often in agreement with much of what he writes both on twitter and for the TES.

Mr Allsop History

Mr Allsop History
Head of Humanities and author of 366 Days: Compelling Stories From World History
If you’re a history teacher and you’ve never come across Scott’s site(http://www.mrallsophistory.com) then I’d be very surprised; it’s a wealth of material as is his twitter feed. Scott regularly shares interesting links, ideas and his own resources.

Mr. Thornton

Mr. Thornton
Subject Leader
A twitter feed of regular inspiration. In my #PedagooHampshire2016 workshop I referred to Mr Thorntons idea for marking crib sheets and it was an instant hit with the attendees. I think his hits shot up from that day (just kidding). You’ll find a continuous source of inspiration on his twitter feed and a can access many of them on his site – https://mrthorntonteach.com/

LoveToTeach

LoveToTeach
Subject Leader
Kate is another of the #TMHistoryIcons team and a valued member of the twitter teaching community. She regularly shares a variety of general teaching and learning ideas as well those for the historian or geographer. Kate runs the blog lovetoteach87.com, check it out.

Russel Tarr

Russel Tarr
History teacher and author of A History Teaching Toolbox: Practical classroom strategies
Russel is probably one of those history teachers that you’d be ashamed to find you missed out of a list of history teachers to follow on twitter. A constant source of inspiration for both subject specific and general teaching and learning ideas. Probably most famed for his sites – activehistory.co.uk and classtools.net His twitter feed is a constant source of inspiration much of which is linked to his own practice.

Heather Mary James

Heather Mary James
Humanities Teacher and Head of Department for Citizenship and PSHE
A ray of sunshine on my feed at times; often shares teaching and learning ideas across the Humanities with a good dose of teacher well-being thrown in. You can also find Heather blogging at thelondonhumanitiesteacher.com

MissSouthernHistory

MissSouthernHistory
Head of History
A lovely lady I’ve had the pleasure to meet at #TMHistoryIcons that regularly shares ideas, links and articles. Regularly shares photos of what’s happening in her classroom, which I love, particularly when the kids are dressed up and bringing their learning to life.

LA McDermott

LA McDermott
History Teacher
Many an interesting idea shared, plenty of inspiration to get your mind lesson planning. Amongst all the good practice you’ll find a few subject specific links.

J Mosley

J Mosley
History Teacher
You’ll find plenty of inspiration on this feed. A consistent source of creativity and plenty of lesson ideas to help with your planning.

Jonny Hemphill

Jonny Hemphill
History Teacher
Now I can’t say I interact with Jonny at all, what I mean is I see inspiring ideas, articles and links shared by him but I don’t think I’ve ever said anything to him even though I’ve shared his tweets on MagpiedPedagogy numerous times. Now I feel bad, so Jonny, here’s a big HIGH FIVE to you, thanks for what you share.

Well hopefully there is someone new on the list for you to follow.

If there’s someone I’ve not included but you think should be, feel free to name them and add a link to their twitter feed in the comments.

 

Mrs Humanities


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Changing Role and Status of Women

Seeing as I’m no longer teaching history but have hundreds of resources, I thought I might start sharing them for others to make use of. So I’m starting with one of my favorite topics from the AQA Specification B (Final exam 2017) on the Changing Role and Status of Women.

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I loved teaching this unit so hope you can make use of the resources which can be found here.

 

mrs-humanities

 


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Resource – Spanish Armada Double Lesson

Today I’m sharing with you one of my favourite double lessons on the Spanish Armada and its defeat.

I particularly love it for two reasons; firstly I was observed teaching part 1 by Ofsted and received a glowing report from the inspector, secondly it enables students to demonstrate their progress very easily over the two lessons.

The resources are an amalgamation of my own ideas and that of others from resources I’ve collated the past few years.

Lesson 1 – The lesson starts with an empathy exercise – putting yourself in the image – and has 3 options for students to choose how to approach the task. Students imagine they are in the image which zooms in and out, I also put sound effects on as students enter the classroom. The choice enables all students to access the task; no matter their ability or the time in which they entered the room.

starter
I’ve edited a few bits out that were relevant to the previous lesson so this resource follows on with a bit of information about the Navy Royal and some rather famous ships. It’s at this point I assess prior knowledge asking questions to obtain what students already know about the Spanish Armada (usually very little).

Next we watch a video and carry out a true or false exercise followed by self-assessment of the answers. To print off the tables off go to the end of the PowerPoint slides for a printable version.

After further discussion we move onto interpreting sources, starting with carrying out an example together.

Finally it’s on to the main task.

main task

This involves looking at sources to interpret why the Spanish were defeated. The activity has been differentiated into 3 bands of challenge for a very mixed ability group.

Spice Level 1 = designed for the lowest ability, many of these students struggled with reading and writing

Spice Level 2 = designed for the middle range most students choose to do this one

Spice Level 3 =  designed towards the most able in the year group

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Students have the opportunity to choose the level of challenge  so they can go above but not below their target level. e.g. students working toward previous level 4 in year 8, would have been aiming to complete the bronze criteria for the topic and therefore would have been guided towards the Spice Level 1 task but could choose to do the Spice Level 2 task, whereas a student working towards level 7 would have only be allowed to do the Spice Level 3 task.

Students progress to different parts of the task sheet, dependent on the level of the task they are working on.

To finish the lesson, students select the criteria they would like assessed by their peer assessment buddy. See the criteria on the slide below. Students are encouraged to pick their weakness for peer assessment. Students then swap books and using the peer assessment pens (green) they use the marking codes or highlight relevant text. Finally they provide a kind comment and a level up target for the student to focus on next lesson.

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Lesson 2

Students finish off the work they started the previous lesson, however this time every time the do the level up target they write in pink pen to evidence their progression.

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I’ve found that when students use a different colour pen to demonstrate the their progress they work a lot harder at doing it correctly e.g. if in lesson 1 a student kept spelling Armada wrong, in lesson 2 they use the pink pen when they use the word in their work. For others it has been for example using punctuation, every time they did a capital letter and full stop it would need to be in pink, this approach made them more conscientious of their work.

Finally if time students self-assess and peer-assess their work using the feedback grid I would use to mark it. They would simply tick the criteria they felt they’d achieved.

When marking the work I would then highlight in one colour the achieved criteria and highlight in a separate colour the criteria they could improve on. For some classes I set improvements as homework others have time in a DIRT lesson later in the term.

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If you’d like to download the resources click here.

Hope the resources can be of use to you.

Mrs Humanities