Mrs Humanities

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Mrs Humanities shares… 5 note taking strategies

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One of my aims for the coming September is to start the school year with my sixth form students looking at different approaches to note taking.

At present my common experience is that students write down the majority of the information on the board whilst adding a few additional notes from our verbal discussion. Not that there is anything wrong with this but I feel confident I can help them to create better notes and use class time more effectively.

Therefore I’ve been doing some research in note taking strategies and thought I’d share a few with you. All of these I will be exploring with my year 12 students in September before helping them to choose a suitable approach.

1 // Cornell method

The page is split into 3 sections, prompts, notes and summary.

cornell2

Prompts – key terminology from the lesson, questions, dates, names etc. that can be reviewed at a later date

Notes – main notes are taken here

Summary – students review the notes and resources after the lesson and summarise. Key points are highlighted ready for revision.

cornell example

2 // Outline method

With this method, students indent their notes with each step becoming more specific. They can split the page into three columns like so.

indent

General information – brief, concise notes on the general content of the lesson

Specifics – concise notes on the specifics of the lesson

Details and examples – facts, stats and specifics to be included here along with any examples or comparisons given

The end product may look something like this…

indent example

or this…

indent 2.png

3 // Highlight and annotate

Before the lesson students will print off the PowerPoint slides or download the PowerPoint to their personal device if they use one. Then quite simply, rather than trying to copy down notes from the board and resources that are provided in advance, students simply listen and annotate them. All too often I find students copying down information that I’ve already provided them with online in advance of the lesson, therefore more time can be spent of using lesson time to deepen their knowledge and understanding through higher thinking tasks, debate and discussion.

annotate.png

4 // Flow based method

The flow based method requires students to write down the main ideas rather than paragraphs and sentences, similar to mind-mapping. Once initial notes are written down, students connect ideas, concepts and specifics by drawing connecting arrows to associated content, key terms and diagrams. This method forces students to consider the inter-connectivity of what they are learning and bring in knowledge from outside the lesson. This form of note-taking is very personal and demonstrates the students flow of thinking.

flow example

This method can easily be turned into a visual format as well.

5 // During-After method

The during-after method involves students splitting the page into two columns like so.

DA

During – students take notes on the content.

After – students write questions either during or after the lesson to test their understanding of the content after the lesson.

DA example

Final Thoughts

For me the key point of these methods will be that students review their notes after the lesson in some way; whether it be summarising, self-testing or simply reviewing their notes. It’s vital that students use and return to their notes regularly.

Hope you’ve grabbed an idea or two. Feel free to provide further suggestions in the comments.

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Mrs Humanities shares… Subject Specific Teacher Facebook Groups

mrs humanities shares

It was pointed out to me after sharing my last Mrs Humanities shares… post on History Revision Resources that many people share their resources via Facebook groups now instead of other online platforms yet I still speak to people who are completely unaware of this.

In order to inform those that might be interested I’ve collated the variety of Facebook teaching groups in this post to help you find them easily. I imagine this is not an exhaustive list so if you know of others please let me know.

geography

General Geography

// National Geography Department

// UK Geography teachers resource sharing

// Geographypods.com

Geography GCSE

// AQA GCSE Geography Teachers Group

// Edexcel Geography B (9-1) Community

// Edexcel GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// Eduqas geography spec B

// OCR A GCSE Geography

// OCR B GCSE Geography Teachers’ Group

// WJEC and WJEC Eduqas GCSE Geography A Teacher Network

// WJEC Geography Teachers

// Edexcel iGCSE Geography

Geography A-Level and IB

// AQA A Level Geography Teachers Group

// OCR Geography AS/A Level Teachers

// Edexcel A Level Geography Teachers Group

// IB DP Geography Teachers Support Group

history

General History

// History Teachers and Those Interested in History Education UK

History GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE History 2016 support group

// Edexcel GCSE History

// New AQA GCSE History 2016

// WJEC/Eduqas GCSE History

// OCR GCSE History A 9-11 support group

// IGCSE History Teachers: Support Group

History A-Level and IB

// Teachers of AQA A level History

// OCR A-Level History support group

// Edexcel A Level History support group

// IBDP History Teachers: Support Group

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General Religious Studies

// Save RE – The Subject Community for RE Professionals

// RE Teachers Forum

Religious Studies GCSE

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Christianity & Islam (Teachers only)

// AQA GCSE Religious Studies – Teachers & Resources

// Edexcel Religious Studies GCSE

// GCSE Hinduism – Religious Studies – RE/RS Teachers Group

// OCR Gcse Religious Studies First Teach 2016

Religious Studies A-Level

// AQA A-Level Religious Studies 2016

// Edexcel Religious Studies A Level (For Teachers Only)

// Eduqas A-Level Religious Studies Teachers

// OCR A Level Religious Studies H173 and H573 for professionals

// KS5 Buddhism Teachers (AS/A2 Religious Studies)

citizenship

General Citizenship

// Teachers of Secondary PSHE & Citizenship

Citizenship GCSE

// Edexcel GCSE Citizenship Studies

other.png

// PSHE, Collective Worship, RE & Citizenship teacher forum

// PSHE & Careers Teachers Centre

// MYP Individuals and Societies: Teachers’ Support Group

I hope this helps you to connect, share and inspire.

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities shares… 5 simple homework strategies

mrs humanities shares

I hate to say it but on many occasions I have set homework just for the sake of it. All of my schools have had a homework policy of sorts i.e. students must receive so many minutes of homework a week. But if students are going to spend 7 hours in school and then complete homework as well it must be worthwhile.

This year I’ve been trying to improve the homework I set to limit the stress experienced by my students. These are some of the techniques I’m using.

1 // Finishing Classwork

It really is that simple. I want my students to have a full set of notes or the ability to be able to complete a task to the best of their ability. To ensure this I regularly set them homework to complete the task or tasks they’ve been undertaking in class. For those that finish in the lesson, there are stretch and challenge tasks to push them further or they spend time reviewing their work and applying it to an offered exam question.

The benefit of this is that my students work hard in lesson, but they know that if they’ve not had time to fully complete something or have needed help and guidance in the lesson and have been delayed in completing their work, they have the time to get it finished.

finishing classwork

2 // Exam Style Questions

Mainly used with exam classes, but occasionally with Key Stage 3. The use of exam style questions for homework is that they encourage students to review their notes and apply their understanding.

We regularly go through exam answer structure for 6 and 9 mark questions, plan the answer and discuss the content. Setting questions for homework then leaves students to apply their learning independently, the use of mark schemes in the hand in lesson then allows for students to self or peer assess before submitting. In order to assess students understanding I also set shorter exam style questions for homework to ensure they regularly apply their learning and develop their exam technique.

esq

3 // Learning Journals

This is a technique I recently introduced with Key Stage 3 so currently still in the trial stage. The concept is that students will reflect, summarise and explore the topic. I’ve set out the end of topic assessed piece of work with the students already so they are aware of the purpose of the learning journal and have allowed them to take whichever route they wish with it. Here’s an example of the instructions I’ve given.

learning journal

At parent’s evening I share the idea with parent’s and they loved the concept. I explained that students weren’t prescribed in the format in which they wish to present their learning journal it can be anything from recording their learning, questions and feelings on the topic in the back of their books to something a bit more creative such as a scrapbook or mood board. They only need to spend 20 minutes on it a week, but should use it to direct their interest into the final assessed piece of work.
Learning Journals

4 // Summary Picture

I don’t set this homework too often but I do find it effective as an insight into my learners understanding and thoughts on a topic. It is quite simple, after a lesson or series of lessons students have to find, take or draw a picture that summarises what they’ve learnt, the answer to a question or how they’ve felt about the topic of study. For example when studying global issues I ask students to find a picture that represents how they feel at the end of the topic about the issues facing our planet and society, they have to write a justification to support the image and we share these with the class. Some bring in images that represent doom and gloom whilst others have brought in images that represent hope and solutions. It’s always insightful to hear their thoughts, opinions and probably more so the justifications for their pictures.

summary picture

Alternatively you can ask students to reflect on their learning journey and bring a picture in that represents that.

5 // Self-Marking Quiz

Now these can take a little time to set up, but once done you can use them time and time again. There are numerous platforms that you can use such as:
SAM Learning
Google forms
Show My Homework
Moodle
EdModo

These are great as they assess students understanding of the knowledge and provides them with immediate feedback. As their teacher you can then look at their scores, their errors and plan appropriately before the lesson to cover misconceptions.

Self marking quizzes

 

What homework strategies do you use regularly?

Feel free to share them in the comments.

Mrs Humanities


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MrsHumanities shares… The Top 10 Posts of 2017

I’m in that reflective mode, considering my experiences and challenges of 2017 that have made me a better person, teacher and friend.

But instead of boring you with my adventures through this year I thought you might like to be directed to the most popular posts on MrsHumanities.com this year. I guess it’s the kind of post that shouts ‘here are all the best in posts in one place’.

#1 My Marking and Feedback Toolkit

This post explore the tools and techniques I use regularly that make up my marking and feedback toolkit. The techniques are tried and tested in my classroom and have taken me several years to reduce down to the most effective strategies. It took a lot of exploration and trial and error to work out what works best for me and my students and this post essentially summaries my go-to strategies.

#2 Zombie Apocalypse Atlas and Map Skills SoW

This post provides what it says on the tin – a full scheme of work on map and atlas skills that are developed through the story of the spread of a zombie apocalypse. The resources have been downloaded far and wide and have even been translated into Welsh.

#3 #Teacher5aday Wellbeing Buddy Box

Since starting #Teacher5adayBuddyBox in February 2016, it has grown and grown. There are now over 1,300 participants, a number of schools have set up their own internal schemes and Surprise September has been a hit this year and last.

This post tells you more about the scheme and how you can get involved; although we do now have a designated site over at www.teacher5adaybuddybox.com so pop over and take a look if you haven’t already.

#4 Resource – Filling the Gaps Ks3 to GCSE

In this post I’ve shared a scheme of work which helps to fill the gaps in student knowledge before they embark on GCSE Geography. In order to create the scheme of work and resources I carefully looked at the GCSE specifications and considered what the foundation knowledge would be in order for my students at the time to be ‘GCSE ready’ and set about creating lessons that would help to close the gaps before the end of year 9. I left that school at the end of the year so overall I’ve little idea how well it worked, but at the time it was doing the trick.

#5 Marking, feedback and DIRT

Despite being quite an old post from June 2015, it’s still a hit with visitors. In this post I’ve explored a variety of marking, feedback and DIRT strategies that I shared in a CPD session. The post provides 15 different strategies for providing feedback and DIRT; all of which I have tested, reflected on and kept or scrapped. It was through all the trial and error that I’ve been able to create what makes my M&F toolkit (see post #1).

#6 Resource: Feedforward Book Look Record

This is a nice simple post that shares the simplest of resources – the Feedforward Book Look Record – as the name might suggest, it’s used for feeding back to my students after I’ve taken a look through their books. The post goes onto explain the record sheet is used and provides a link for you to download it.

#7 Resource – GCSE Structure Sheet

One of my most recent posts, this post shares my GCSE structure sheet to support students in writing answers to 9 mark questions. Although suited to the AQA GCSE Geography specification, I imagine it has some use for other specifications. I’ve provided both a word and PDF version to allow for teachers to edit to suit their course and students.

#8 50 T&L Secret Mission Cards

If I’m honest this is one of my favourite resources, which I’ve never actually used myself. I created these for my last school to develop the CPD programme but then proceeded to leave before the next September came around. However I know they have been a hit in other schools, having received lots of feedback on them. I love that others have gone away and taken the idea and turned it into something that suits there context. Actually I’d love to do a post on the ways they’ve been used and adapted by others – so if you’ve used them get in touch. 

#9 Mrs Humanities shares… 10 Geography Teachers to follow on Twitter.

In this post I simple shared 10 great geography teachers worth following on Twitter. Simple.

#10 Resource – SpACE Peer Assessment

When writing this post I was surprised to find that this post was slightly more popular than the ‘Resource – ACE Peer Assessment‘ one. Either way I’m pleased they are both being explored. The ACE and SpACE peer assessment technique has become one of my go-to strategies making up my M&F toolkit (see #1). It is now embedded with my classes and better still I’m seeing it being used by others in the school. The students have really benefited from it and many have said they find it useful which personally I think is great. I’ve also seen it used in other schools thanks to Twitter and seeing the variety of ways it has been implemented has been great and good for my own practice.

I hope this round-up gives you something new to take away or even just reminds you of something you may have forgotten.

Thanks for all the support this year, hope I’ve been able to inspire you in some way.

Have a great 2018.

Best wishes.

Mrs Humanities

 

 


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Mrs Humanities shares… T&L accounts to follow on Twitter

mrs humanities shares

This week I thought I’d share awesome twitter accounts for general Teaching and Learning inspiration.

So in no particular order… (although obviously I’ll start with mine)

Magpied Pedagogy

MP

Magpied Pedagogy simply collates the amazing practice shared on twitter. The twitter account simply tweets the posts from the webpage –https://magpiedpedagogy.wordpress.com/ – where you will find over 750 ideas collated from across twitter.

Pedagoo.org

ped

#PedagooFriday is probably one of those tags I find most inspiration from. If you’ve not come across Pedagoo Friday before you’re seriously missing out. I won’t lie, when I’m collating tweets to embed into MagpiedPedagogy it’s one of the first hashtags I seek out; there’s a huge array of ideas and subjects covered by it.

Pedagoo is a community of teachers learning through sharing classroom practice, you can join in at  or through the previously mentioned weekly hashtag: 

Pete Sanderson & Lesson Toolbox

ps

Collator of great ideas shared under the hashtag  

Pete shares ideas from far and wide. If you ever need a sprinkle of inspiration check out the Lesson Toolbox twitter feed or his site – https://lessontoolbox.wordpress.com/.

 

Try This Teaching

ttt

Created by  | Try This Teaching shares and promotes a toolkit of T&L ideas based on the site http://www.trythisteaching.com/toolkit/  

Outstanding Teaching

ot

Affiliated with Andy Griffith & Mark Burns, the Creators of the Outstanding Teaching Intervention and the authors of Engaging Learners and Teaching Backwards, this twitter feed regularly shares tips, ideas and good practice from classrooms across the UK as well as links to research and publications.

Isabella Wallace

iw

Now technically it’s not Isabella that I’m recommending here, but more the pedagogical hashtag she created – . If you’ve not heard of the concept of Poundland Pedagogy, then let me briefly explain it to you. Quite simply it’s the idea that cheap products from shops such as Poundland and PoundStretchers can be used to enhance teaching and student engagement through creative and innovative approaches.

There are a huge range of ideas to be found under the hashtag and I highly recommend taking a look.

 


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Mrs Humanities shares… 5 tips for NQTs

mrs humanities shares

I remembed my NQT year as incredibly stressful, more so than my PGCE. I found myself in a challengeing school with extremely high expectations for staff. Whilst my department were amazing as was the NQT co-ordinator and lots of the other staff from across the school were very supportive, it was a difficult year.

Within the 1st term Ofsted decided to turn up, madness struck by the October half term. Workload was relentless, constantly planning, marking and assessing progress. It was hard work but taught me so much. So I thought I’d share a few tips for those embarking of their NQT year soon, these are based on personal experiences and others may have different advice.

  1. Forget progress in the first term. 
    Honestly spend the first term getting to know your students; how do they learn? What learning activities do they enjoy? What contributions do they make to school life? What hobbies do they have outside of school? Get to know the young people you are teaching. Build those all important relationships and make it clear what your expectations are in the first term. Personally I wished I’d done exactly that during the first few weeks of my NQT year rather than worrying about whether students were making progress. I now like to spend the first term finding out where my students are in regard to their subject knowledge, a bit about them and making my classroom expectations explicit. I make sure they are doing the little things that make the bigger things easier e.g. keeping their book tidy, meeting homework deadlines etc. and if they are not I crack down on it immediately – detentions, phone calls home, no second chances.
  2. Set up clear routines.
    My first school had a clear routine for students once they entered the classroom. Collect books, get out equipment, write the date, title and learning objective and underline them and then get on with the starter task until the register had been taken. This made it easy to set up initial routines. If your school doesn’t have a specific start to lessons, create one. Students like consistency and knowing what to expect. Lay that out for them from day 1; once they know they then know your expectations as well.
    However it’s not just the start of lessons you need to set up routines for. Consider routines for some of the following:
    – End of lesson
    Peer/Self assessment
    Class discussions
    – Handing books in
    – Toilet requests
    The list could continue but I don’t want to overwhelm anyone.
  3. Know your expectations
    Ensure you know what you expect from your students before the first day of school. It’s important when setting the foundations with your classes that you are clear in regards to what you’d expect from them and what they can expect from you. You will find yourself spending the first few weeks constantly repeating these rules and expectations but once your students are clear on them and are able to remember them (if you work in secondary, remember they will have numerous teachers with different expectations and routines they won’t instantly remember yours) you can then start to focus on the bigger picture – student progress. Word of caution though, ensure your expectations are achievable – if students feel there is no way or chance of them meeting your expectations you maybe faced with some behavioural issues.
  4. Know the school rules
    Consistency is important, ensure you know and understand the school rules and behavioural routines before you start teaching. In the long run it makes life in the classroom easier for you; give warnings clearly, set detentions and chase them up. Phone home if you have to. Once student’s know they can’t mess you around and that you a consistent and follow through life in the classroom eventually becomes a little easier. Also it’s really annoying when you constantly follow school behaviour routines and find that others are not, it makes your teaching life a lot more difficult if staff are not consistent and following the school wide routines. Firstly students know what to expect if they consistently come up against the same routines, also they can’t argue back if you do what everyone else is (or should) be doing. Be firm, be consistent. Ensure that you and other NQTs know and follow the routines set out.
  5. Smile before Christmas
    I’m sure you would have heard plenty of words of wisdom like the old ‘don’t smile before Christmas’. Ignore it. Greet your students on their way in and around the school. Talk to them off topic now and then. Tell them little snippets about yourself. Be human. Personally I tried too hard to be ‘a teacher’ and not a human teaching other humans; I felt I had to be 100% the professional and didn’t feel it was acceptable to share anything about myself with my students. I later realised this doesn’t work. It makes you unapproachable and unrelatable. Once you’ve established routines and expectations you can begin to ‘relax’ a little with your students and let them see a bit of you – you’re favourite colour (often related to the colour pen a student is using for their notes), your favourite parts of the topic (*insert excited face here* don’t get me started on climate change, I could talk about it for hours), your favourite books (oh,  I see your reading….I love it, have you got to the part where…. whoops was that a spolier?). I’m sure you get the picture. Have those conversations with your students; let them see you are human too.

I hope this is some use to you, feel free to ask questions or for the more experienced of you feel free to add your top tips in the comments.

Thanks for reading.

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities shares… 8 RE Teachers to follow on Twitter

mrs humanities shares

For the third in the series of Mrs Humanities shares… I thought I’d go ahead and recommend some of the fantastic RE teachers out there that far too often get forgotten when it comes to the Humanities.

Whilst at my last school I had been setting up the Humanities department from scratch, whilst RE wasn’t taught as a stand along subject I tried to incorporate it as often as possible. I often looked to twitter for inspiration.

In no particular order then…

Dawn Cox

Dawn Cox
RE Teacher and T&L
From Dawn you will find a huge wealth of knowledge and information on RE teaching as well as teaching and learning in general. There’s always something up for debate or discussion on her feed; whilst I rarely get involved they are often enlightening. Take a look at her site missdcoxblog.wordpress.com for inspiration.

Andy Lewis

Andy Lewis
Assistant Headteacher / Director of RE
Andy was a regular source of information, he often shares insightful links that are helpful to the non-specialist and specialist RE teacher alike. You can find out more about Andy and his contributions to the teacher community at his site mrlewisre.co.uk.

Laura Passmore

Laura Passmore
RE teacher
This lovely lady is a good tweacher friend and often provided snippets of inspiration. Whilst Laura doesn’t share so much in the way of teaching practice from her classroom, what she does provide is an array of links and ideas from across the web that can be useful for both RE and teachers in general. Passionately promotes teacher well-being and is a member of the #teacher5adaybuddybox community.

Miss Westbury

Miss Westbury
Second in Department
A variety of smashing pieces of good practice can be found on Miss Westbury’s feed along with links, articles and general teachery goodness.

SN RE Teacher

SN RE Teacher
Head of RE
Often you’ll find snippets of what is going on in Sue’s classroom, along with plenty of links and re-tweets of helpful articles and sites.

Clare Nolan

Clare Nolan
Leader of KS3 RE
Relatively new to the teaching profession but an active member of the teaching community with a wee blog at clareenolan.wordpress.com although no new content as of late. Often you’ll find snippets of what’s going on in Clare’s classroom along with how she works with the Girl Guiding Association.

Corrine Guntrip

Corrine Guntrip

Trust RE and Ethos Lead
Plenty of positive inspiration can be found on Corrine’s twitter feed; more recently in terms of her own work/life balance (especially with the cutie that is Buddy, I think that’s the dogs name?!) but also plenty of re-tweets of relevance to RE and education.

Jo

Jo
Newly appointed Research Lead at CHS.
Lots of inspiration for the RE and other Humanities teacher. Good balance of subject specific, wellbeing and T&L inspiration available.

And one little extra one

 

Jessica Nield

Jessica Nield
RE and Humanities Teacher
This one’s not posted much (yet) but she’s my sister-in-law so I had to add her for encouragement to get more involved in the T&L community.

Hope you’ve found someone new to follow.

Feel free to add any other recommendations in the comments. I might even add them to the post as I’d like to take it up to 10 recommendations.

Mrs Humanities

 


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Mrs Humanities shares… 10 History Teachers to follow on Twitter.

mrs humanities shares

This is the second in my new series of posts – Mrs Humanities shares… In each post from the series I will be sharing some of the stand out practice I’m regularly inspired by, interesting ideas, recently shared resources, news stories etc. If there’s something in particular you’d like to see then suggestions are warmly welcomed.

This time I’m really excited to be sharing some fantastic practitioners that I’ve had the pleasure of meeting in person on several occasions and love sharing ideas with. Others I’m yet to meet but find them a source of inspiration regularly. In no particular order then…

Tom Rogers

Tom Rogers
Head of History and owner of  RogersHistory.com
This man is the mind behind #TMHistoryIcons, a quality source of inspiration for both the historian and general teacher alike. Often in agreement with much of what he writes both on twitter and for the TES.

Mr Allsop History

Mr Allsop History
Head of Humanities and author of 366 Days: Compelling Stories From World History
If you’re a history teacher and you’ve never come across Scott’s site(http://www.mrallsophistory.com) then I’d be very surprised; it’s a wealth of material as is his twitter feed. Scott regularly shares interesting links, ideas and his own resources.

Mr. Thornton

Mr. Thornton
Subject Leader
A twitter feed of regular inspiration. In my #PedagooHampshire2016 workshop I referred to Mr Thorntons idea for marking crib sheets and it was an instant hit with the attendees. I think his hits shot up from that day (just kidding). You’ll find a continuous source of inspiration on his twitter feed and a can access many of them on his site – https://mrthorntonteach.com/

LoveToTeach

LoveToTeach
Subject Leader
Kate is another of the #TMHistoryIcons team and a valued member of the twitter teaching community. She regularly shares a variety of general teaching and learning ideas as well those for the historian or geographer. Kate runs the blog lovetoteach87.com, check it out.

Russel Tarr

Russel Tarr
History teacher and author of A History Teaching Toolbox: Practical classroom strategies
Russel is probably one of those history teachers that you’d be ashamed to find you missed out of a list of history teachers to follow on twitter. A constant source of inspiration for both subject specific and general teaching and learning ideas. Probably most famed for his sites – activehistory.co.uk and classtools.net His twitter feed is a constant source of inspiration much of which is linked to his own practice.

Heather Mary James

Heather Mary James
Humanities Teacher and Head of Department for Citizenship and PSHE
A ray of sunshine on my feed at times; often shares teaching and learning ideas across the Humanities with a good dose of teacher well-being thrown in. You can also find Heather blogging at thelondonhumanitiesteacher.com

MissSouthernHistory

MissSouthernHistory
Head of History
A lovely lady I’ve had the pleasure to meet at #TMHistoryIcons that regularly shares ideas, links and articles. Regularly shares photos of what’s happening in her classroom, which I love, particularly when the kids are dressed up and bringing their learning to life.

LA McDermott

LA McDermott
History Teacher
Many an interesting idea shared, plenty of inspiration to get your mind lesson planning. Amongst all the good practice you’ll find a few subject specific links.

J Mosley

J Mosley
History Teacher
You’ll find plenty of inspiration on this feed. A consistent source of creativity and plenty of lesson ideas to help with your planning.

Jonny Hemphill

Jonny Hemphill
History Teacher
Now I can’t say I interact with Jonny at all, what I mean is I see inspiring ideas, articles and links shared by him but I don’t think I’ve ever said anything to him even though I’ve shared his tweets on MagpiedPedagogy numerous times. Now I feel bad, so Jonny, here’s a big HIGH FIVE to you, thanks for what you share.

Well hopefully there is someone new on the list for you to follow.

If there’s someone I’ve not included but you think should be, feel free to name them and add a link to their twitter feed in the comments.

 

Mrs Humanities


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Mrs Humanities shares… 10 Geography Teachers to follow on Twitter.

mrs humanities shares

Okay so this is something new I’m trying a new monthly feature on things that stand out to me. This could be anything from teachers to follow on twitter, interesting pedagogical practices, recently shared resources, news stories etc. Suggestions welcomed.

I’m starting with 10 Geography Teachers to follow on Twitter, these are people I regularly interact with, follow links posted or magpie ideas from. There are many more I could add but I really can’t spend all day writing a post. So in NO particular order.

David Rogers

David Rogers
Geographer & Author of  100 Ideas for Secondary Teachers: Outstanding Geography Lessons

Can often be found causing a stir, shares a great deal of insightful articles, links and resources for the everyday teacher and/or geographer. Writes about geography, pedagogy and wellbeing at http://www.davidrogers.blog/.

jennnnnn

jennnnnn ❤️️🌎

Head of Geography
Regularly shares great teaching practice for the geographer and general teacher alike. A particular stand out example has to be IDEAL. Check it out here.
Hoping she might write a guest post for us all soon (hint, hint).

Rob Chambers

Rob Chambers
Head of Geography
Set up the AQA teacher schoology collective; a huge amount of resources have been shared widely as a result. Regularly shares geographical articles and the occasional resource. Shares good practice at http://www.geobytes.org.uk/.

Mark Enser

Mark Enser
Head of Geography
Shares teaching and learning ideas, information and topical debates. Has many insightful posts on his site https://teachreal.wordpress.com/

P Logue

 P Logue
Subject Lead for Geography and Subject Lead for Ethics & Philosophy.
Shares a wide variety of resources, pedagogical practice and articles related to geography and the humanities. Paul has recently written a guest post on differentiation, check it out.

Geographyblog

Geographyblog

Head of Humanities, main subject Geography.
Shares some excellent resources, most of which are freely available on TES. Provides lots of inspiration for creative teaching techniques.

Kate Stockings

Kate Stockings
Head of Geography.
Kate has shared lots of good practice and ideas for teaching Geography.

GeographyPods

GeographyPods

Head of Geography
You would have probably come across Matt’s site at one time or another – http://www.geographypods.com/. I use it regularly now that I teach the International Baccalaureate. Whilst a bit quieter on the old twitter front these days (mastering the work/life balance I hope) but still shares a range of great ideas, articles and links.

Hanna R

Hanna R
Geography Teacher
Hanna wrote the first guest post on the site on how she’s combined approaches from both myself and @P Logue. She regularly shares teaching ideas and articles, both relevant for the geographer and general teacher alike with a bit of wellbeing thrown in.

GeoBlogs

GeoBlogs
Author of http://livinggeography.blogspot.co.uk/
Alan is a very experienced teacher and Geographer. He shares a wide range of articles, links and research. He’s a wealth of knowledge and an active member of the geographical community.

 

Finally…

This list could go on for a lot longer, unfortunately I do not have the time to continue it now but might add to it as time goes on.

Please feel free to share any particular recommendations you have for geographers to follow on twitter in the comments.

Mrs Humanities