Mrs Humanities

Because I'm married to the job.


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Resource – UK Population Distribution

UK Population Distribution Resources
Last week it was our self-evaluation week so observations galore. Fortunately we know in advance when we will be observed, giving us time to prepare.

I was booked in to be observed teaching a low ability year 7 class. The topic of the lesson was UK population patterns. I’ve taught the topic many times over the last few years but had never come up with a way to make it distinctly ‘active’. Usually it has involved discussing population distribution in the classroom, demonstrating sparse and dense population densities and looking at a few maps to describe and find reasons for the patterns.

I knew this would not be engaging enough this time. I struggled for ideas initially but eventually came up with this…..differentiated task pots

I’d set similar tasks to those I carried out in the past but created more choice, challenge and engagement.

There were cards sorts instead of a powerpoint, worksheets instead of well a powerpoint… I’m sure you get how it’s been carried out before.

I started by creating 3 levels of task, identified by a spice grading.

l3 worksheet l4 worksheet l5 worksheet

(please note I do not own the copyright of the maps used, they were in resources I’d used at a previous school and I’ve taken them out of the versions you can download)

I’ve used spice rating many a time before but thought I’d add some intrigue to the task by placing the card sort materials into takeaway cartons. And yes, it worked, the students were eager to engage with the tasks in order to open their carton.

spice 1 spice 3 spice 2

In each container there were cards suited to the task set on the worksheet.

Level 3 (spice rating 1) – cards to sort into sparse or dense
Level 4 (spice rating 2) – cards to sort into those relevant to London or the Scottish Highlands
Level 5 (spice rating 3) – 4 location cards and both picture and text cards to help explain why there would be a sparse or dense population.

The opportunity to write on the tables with a white board pen I imagine helped make the activity engaging.

population distribution task

I used for the first time WAGOLL  (what a good one looks like) to demonstrate to the students what I would be looking for as part of the level 5 card sort task. It helped them to focus on what my expectations were and how they should go about it. Will definitely use WAGOLL again.

WAGOLL

The feedback from the lesson was very positive (judged Outstanding, even though I don’t like gradings).

You can download my resources below.

I’ve take images out but you can easily replace them.

level 3 worksheetlevel 4 worksheetlevel 5 worksheetpopulation distribution card sort population distribution

Hope the resources are of use.

Mrs Humanities

POPULATION STUDY MAT


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Resource – Population Study Mat

population matMy year 10’s have all come from a variety of different secondary schools before joining ours in September. As a result it is a struggle finding out what they do and don’t know for each topic. Usually it is very varied and often I find quite a significant number have very patchy KS3 knowledge of Geography.  Therefore much of the time I have to teach KS3 content before I can move on to teaching the KS4 content – not great when there is such depth and breadth required by the specification and only 2 hours a week to teach the course.

For the next 3-4 weeks we are studying population dynamics. To speed things up a bit I’ve created this Population Study Mat. Each pupil will have a copy of the double sided mat with key terms and helpful hints to use each lesson.

POPULATION STUDY MAT POPULATION STUDY MAT

I’m encouraging them to make use of revision sites at home so have used images that would be familiar to them. These are not my own images hence why I have included the original source.

In the downloadable version I’ve removed the images but you could easily add your own.

download population mat

Click the image to download the word document

Hope you can make use of it.

Mrs Humanities


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Humanities in the News – Edition 2

geography resourcesThe last 2 weeks have been interesting both in school and in the news. Pupils have brought up topics such as the Scottish Referendum independently and we have spent a good 15 minutes or so discussing it. It may not be part of the lesson plan but if it develops their interest in the news I’m all for it. Ofsted may not agree.

1// Scotland voted NO!

Following from Edition 1 the Scottish Referendum had an interesting turn out, 55% of the Scottish population that voted decided they wanted to stay in Great Britain. I honestly thought the Yes vote was going to win.

This however I feel sets a precedent for change and many questions for pupils to consider.

How will this outcome affect future elections? With Alex Salmond stepping down from the SNP, who will take his place? Will the SNP remain as Scotland’s largest party?
Will there be greater devolution of power to enable Scotland to implement what Scotland feels in best for them?
Why did 45% of the population that voted want independence so much?
Will the people of Scotland get along in peace or will there be clashes for years to come?
What does this mean for Wales?

Here are some articles that have been published recently that maybe used for dicussion and debate

1.In Record Turnout Demographics Shape Scotland’s Emphatic No Vote –

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/09/140919-scotland-united-kingdom-referendum-vote-results-photos/

2. Politicians ponder Scotland’s future – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-29289035

3. Salmond to quit after Scots vote No – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-29277527

4. Cameron pledges devolution revolution after no vote – http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/sep/19/scottish-referendum-david-cameron-devolution-revolution

5. Police separate rival groups in Glasgow – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-29288249

6. Queen urges referendum ‘respect’ – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-29287662

Teaching Resources 

Whilst I haven’t found any resources,  I do like the idea of taking photos from these articles and using them as a discussion point with pupils. Encourage the pupils to consider the story of the image, perhaps get them to match images to headlines.

2// 11 Billion People

A new report estimates that the global population could reach 11 billion by 2100. With rapid population growth, exponential urbanisation, overconsumption and dwindling resources the ability to sustain ourselves presents more and more challenges. I love teaching the topic of population change and the challenges it poses but the exam specifications I feel make it so boring. There’s so much to cram in that its difficult to take the topic off on a (relevant) tangent and really explore the issue. In the past I have enjoyed teaching population to KS3, we’ve had the time to explore the problems of overpopulation and the role of a variety of factors in population change such as industrialisation and ageing populations.

Whilst the following articles do not explore population alone I wanted to include them as they would make interesting talking points in relation to population growth and the issues presented by a growing population.

1.  A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates – http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/09/140918-population-global-united-nations-2100-boom-africa/

2. Humans: the real threat to life on Earth – http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jun/30/stephen-emmott-ten-billion

3. It’s not overpopulation that causes climate change, it’s overconsumption – http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/sep/19/not-overpopulation-that-causes-climate-change-but-overconsumption

4. We need to develop a new urban agenda – let’s start on World Cities Day – http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/sep/17/world-cities-day-united-nations-habitat-new-urban-agenda

5. Africa’s Population Will Quadruple by 2100. What Does That Mean for its Cities? – http://www.citylab.com/design/2014/09/africas-population-will-quadruple-by-2100-what-does-that-mean-for-its-cities/380507/

Teaching Resources

There are so many resources on population and population growth, so many to choose from.

My favourite, the Jelly Baby Population Game. A winner all round. I have adjusted it slightly when I’ve used it but this is the original one I’ve adapted. It works well with all learners from Ks2 to Ks5.

There are a selection of ideas on the National Geographic site – Population 7 Billion. I like the idea of the Pasta Population Map. Might try it at some point.

There are an array of resources on the TES,  I like this lesson on Malthus and Boserup.

3// Explosive Eruption

Last one is short and simple, If you haven’t seen the amazing footage of a sonic boom created by the eruption of Mount Tavurvur in Papua New Guinea, watch this clip. It demonstrates the a sonic boom created by a volcanic eruption. Amazing!

1.  “Holy Smokin’ Toledoes…” Volcano Sonic Boom! – http://www.brainstuffshow.com/blog/holy-smokin-toledoes-volcano-sonic-boom/

2. Volcanic Sounds – http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/book/export/html/385

 

Hope it’s useful. Please share with friends and colleagues.

Enjoy!

Mrs Humanities